Read This Guide to Interview Clothes And Feel A Modicum of Control Over Your Destiny

Omg, there is a Fast Company article has a guide to what color clothes you should wear to a job interview. Ahh! It’s kind of hilarious and I give it as much credence as I would any pop psychology business book.

Green is a color often associated with a sense of calm and wellbeing, as well as wealth and prosperity. Davidson says it’s a good choice for an accent color as it will not only put the interviewer at ease, it will send a message of possibility and growth.

For more creative environments, Davidson suggests wearing a color that pops such as purple or yellow: “Purple sends a message of being artistic and unique, while yellow signifies optimism and creativity,” she says.

Orange, however, topped the CareerBuilder list for the worst color, with 25% of employers saying it was the color most likely to be associated with someone who is unprofessional.

I just met with someone about my writing future and I wore a black dress and an “oatmeal”-colored cardigan. This was not my ideal color palette but um, I just had a baby and will not be attending any professional engagements in anything except for all black. I know I should buy new clothes that fit me and wear color and I will feel better but should should should, I’M WEARING BLACK. I’m mourning the loss of my life.

Job of the Day: Barista For The CIA Starbucks

The CIA Starbucks looks just like regular Starbuckses, except there is no writing names on cups and if someone questions the baristas too much they’re supposed to report it. Also there is a very long line since employees aren’t exactly running in and out and going for walks to ‘grab a coffee’ off the premises.

The Real History of Madewell, 1937

Last time I mentioned Madewell here you guys had a lot of feelings about so I am very excited for you to read this Dan Nosowitz piece, How Madewell Bought And Sold My Family’s History.

I stopped dead on Broadway, in the middle of the sidewalk, and stared, not up at the beautiful wrought-iron SoHo buildings, as would befit someone who’d moved to New York in the past month, but at an ordinary sign advertising a small clothing shop. The logo, a casual cursive scrawl with both E’s capitalized, jumped out at me like a beacon from a lighthouse somewhere deep in the back of my brain. That was the logo emblazoned on my baby clothes, the logo my great-grandfather created. It was, I thought, forgotten family history, the factories having shut down shortly after I was born in the ’80s. After a moment I took out my phone and called my mom and asked her what the hell was going on.

Nosowitz’s great-grandfather, a turn-of-the-century Russian immigrant, started the real Madewell, a workwear company (in the um, actual sense) in 1937. Mickey Drexler bought the logo, and the right to put “1937″ on all their shit, in 2006.

This piece is a wonderful reclamation of family history as well as a meditation on the (bastardized) notions of authenticity in consumerism. It totally upended my readerly expectations and I’m obsessed with it.

Overapologizing in The Modern Age

Saying ‘I’m sorry’ too much, especially at work, gets a bad rap. It’s meek; it’s feminine, overly accommodating, self-deprecating; it’s fake. As a chronic over-apologizer in social interactions, if not in the big ways when it matters (for better or worse!), I really loved Clay Risen’s essay about empathy and the different kinds of sorry:

Caitlin Moran on Being Absorbed Into The Middle Class

This Longreads interview of Caitlin Moran is hilarious and great. She talks about the hell of writing a book (hint: do not drink 12 cups of espresso before noon) and teen fantasies and masturbation and all that good stuff. She also has some interesting insight into what it’s like finding success and being ‘absorbed into the middle class’:

My 1 Thing Don’t Want None

Thursday is a great day to do that 1 thing you don’t want to do but also don’t want to continue thinking about doing.

What It’s Like To Work For The U.S. Postal Service

Jess Stoner’s essay in The Morning News about working as a contract worker — “city carrier assistant” — for the U.S. Postal Service (“YOU EXIST TO REDUCE OVERTIME” as her boss screamed at her) is revelatory and maddening and great. Stoner was hired at $15.13 an hour, earning $1000 every two weeks. As she outlines, though, it’s much more complicated than that.

Job of the Day: Obituary Writer

Once more with feeling! I’ve written about Margalit Fox before, she of the amazing name and amazing-er job, writing obits for the NYT. This time, she’s interviewed in the Paris ReviewA [DAILY] and I want to quote a million things from it:

IMPORTANT: How to Reheat Leftover Pizza

Anything that contributes to you living your Best Life falls under the purview of the Billfold, or so I’ve decided, so this, from Food52, about having perfectly reheated pizza — certainly a cornerstone of living your best life — is relevant to our readership. It’s also budget-friendly, in that you’ve already spent the money, so having pizza for lunch the next day is BASICALLY FREE.

Mass Transit is Amazing For Everyone (Else)

You can’t really feel smug about taking public transpo when you live in New York, where driving to work would be a special kind of hell. But if you live in a city where it’s possible to park and drive and blare the radio and not be surrounded on all sides of your body by terrible terrible people on your way to things, and you still take public transportation: you get to feel smug.

A Brooklyn Poet Has Moved To Detroit, Will Die Eventually

Well, well, well. Remember the Detroit Write A House fellowship we talked about, wherein a Detroit organization gives you the deed to a house if you agree to um, live in Detroit and blog about it for two years? Well, according to The Michigan Daily, they’ve declared a winner. That winner is a poet from Brooklyn.