On It's a Weird Day. Let's Rank States!

Connecticut does have Mystic Seaport, if you're into that sort of thing, which I am. In a bar (in Providence RI) a couple of years ago, I overheard one rich-looking guy telling another "I live in Old Lyme but I work in Old Saybrook," which I found utterly hilarious. Stereotypes come to life!

Posted on September 2, 2014 at 2:33 pm 0

On Meet The World's First Bookless Library

I'll be the killjoy who points out that this is definitely not the FIRST bookless library. They even have a Wikipedia page about them: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bookless_library

Posted on August 27, 2014 at 3:50 pm 1

On Amtrak Hacks

@Allison Maybe not always … but a lot.

Posted on August 22, 2014 at 4:40 pm 0

On Your Waistline = Your Boss's Business

Does anyone reading this use Credit Karma? They keep asking me to "connect" my accounts. Would this involve giving them my card numbers or passwords? Is it safe? And would it improve the accuracy of the credit scores they give me, or have any advantage other than letting me use Credit Karma as yet another spending tracker?

Posted on August 22, 2014 at 3:13 pm 0

On Amtrak Hacks

I ride Amtrak along the NE Corridor once every 1-3 months. My National Association of Rail Passengers membership paid for itself and saved me at least a hundred bucks last year, even though the discount doesn't apply to some trains. Plus: it's fun to say. NARP!

Posted on August 22, 2014 at 3:08 pm 0

On The Cost of a False Sense of Security: One $95 Earthquake Kit

Hey, why does the "Two Person Streamline Kit" include THREE body warmers and THREE dust masks?

Posted on August 5, 2014 at 1:14 pm 0

On The Cost of a False Sense of Security: One $95 Earthquake Kit

@haverwench For what it's worth, here's one idea I've heard for keeping warm in a winter power outage: pitch a freestanding tent inside your home. Put a few blankets on its floor and your sleeping bags on top of them, and you're all set.

Posted on August 5, 2014 at 12:38 pm 0

On Life in the Desert: The Troubling Need for Cars

The problem is more than just poor public transportation, it's the layout of our cities and suburbs. Most places in America were designed assuming everyone has access to a car. Thus we had planners thinking "it's okay to zone this four-square-mile subdivision as residential only, no stores" or "it's okay to put an eight-lane highway between this neighborhood and downtown" or "nah, we don't need sidewalks near this elementary school." Better layout would have made these places more livable even without good public transportation.

Posted on July 24, 2014 at 2:13 pm 5

On Concerning Eschewing Ivies and Raising Working-Class Heroes

@tad123 @andnowlights True, those are real examples of hostility to the rich. What I was objecting to was the idea that this hostility extends beyond the actual rich to "anyone with any money," which I took to mean anyone who isn't poor or close to it.

Posted on July 24, 2014 at 1:37 pm 0

On Concerning Eschewing Ivies and Raising Working-Class Heroes

@andnowlights There's a huge gap between "trust-fund kids" and "anyone with any kind of money." I don't see any hostility against the latter here. If you do, could you cite some examples?

Posted on July 23, 2014 at 1:56 pm 0