Taking Advantage Of Friends In Faraway Places

Getting some Spanish sunshine on our British skin was delightful. Even better, it was a real bargain.

Vacation Economics vs. Real Life Economics

In vacation economics, money is fluid and everlasting. In real life economics, spending is limited. Same rules apply for calories consumed.

What Makes a Vacation?

Since it’s Travel and Vacation Month here at The Billfold, I’d like to ask all of you: what makes a vacation? It’s something I’m thinking about this summer, as I try to figure out whether I’m going to take a vacation or whether the travel I already have planned “counts” as vacation.

Freelancers, Take the Vacation Too

I’m going on vacation from January 31-February 8 (the JoCo Cruise) and I’m estimating I’ll miss out on at least $1,000 in income unless I try to write a bunch of it in advance.

The Beach: A Bargain or A Bummer?

Stranded at SeaWorld vs Whale Watching

Budgeting for Vacations, Other People’s Weddings, and Other Summer Stuff (Yay Summer!)

Vacations I’ve Taken And What They’ve Cost Me

The week before we left for Hawaii, someone stole my debit card and spent what little I had in my checking account at a Target somewhere in the middle of the country. I spent hours on the phone to the bank, trying to figure out if I would have money before getting on a plane and zipping off to an island where I presumed I’d need to spend money.

The Cost of Spring Break with School-Age Children, Illustrated and Annotated

Of all the coming sacrifices that you fail to consider when you have kids (so many!), the most insidious is how all the vacation time you accumulate will be divided in equal measure between staying home with them when they are sick and taking them places when they are on school vacation. This is not to say that raising kids isn’t wonderful and enriching and etc. etc., but for much of their lives, they are whiny travelers who insist on doing boring stuff. Important pleasures that they generally fail to appreciate include ocean sunsets, after-rain forest smell, and weekends walking around Philadelphia and getting drunk. Also, entertaining them costs money.

A Holiday in Montana

Montana wasn’t a state I ever gave much thought to until I found myself staring out the window of an Amtrak train at the seemingly unchanging scenery of big sky country. As the train rattled down the tracks I started to wonder if we were even moving—the scenery seemed to repeat itself every 30 seconds like the fake background behind a car in an old movie. It’s hard to explain it, but the miles upon miles of emptiness gave me a sense of reverse claustrophobia.