Michigan Proposes Its Own Pay It Forward Tuition Plan

As USA Today reports, the state legislature in Michigan is reviewing a bill to create a sort of radical new tuition program that's known as the "pay-it-forward" system. Basically, you go to school for free ("free"), then pay back the school, interest-free, out of your future paycheck. Your payments cover the next kid to go to school for "free."

Is the U.S. Facing a Shortage of Factory Workers?

So why are American factories reporting that 600,000 jobs are going vacant across the country?

Kentuckians: Get a Free Steak Dinner and a Chance to Win a Handgun

In an effort its spokesman has described as "outreach to rednecks," the Kentucky Baptist Convention is leading "Second Amendment Celebrations," where churches around the state give away guns as door prizes to lure in the unchurched in hopes of converting them to Christ. As many as 1,000 people are expected at the next one, on Thursday at Lone Oak Baptist Church in Paducah, where they will be given a free steak dinner and the chance to win one of 25 handguns, long guns and shotguns.

Sunday’s Minimum Wage Discussion

Yakking about the minimum wage.

Helping Your Parents in Their Retirement

Yesterday, USA Today posted this graph showing that 44 percent of surveyed adults believe that children should contribute to their parents retirement if the parents don't have enough money to live on in their old age. That's a good amount, though more than half of respondents either don't know or don't think their kids should have that kind of financial responsibility. I personally would not want my kids (the ones I do not have yet) to worry about supporting me in my old age, but I also feel obligated to help my parents in theirs—I don't want them to just be getting by; I want them to have a reasonable standard of living. Obviously, this is the type of financial discussions that adult children should have with their parents (along with things like living wills and end-of-life care). It's something I talk about with my parents whenever I visit them for the holidays: "What do your retirement accounts look like?" It's better to know now than to be caught off guard later.