Alumni Giving Season

It’s the holiday season again, which means it’s that time of year when universities try to raise more money from their alumni. Every year around this time, I start getting a call every day from an unknown number. At first, I ignore it, thinking it’s a wrong number. But I eventually realize that it’s someone calling from one of the universities I’ve attended and that they are not going to stop until they talk to an actual person.

Let’s Throw Some Money at Our Problems: October 2014 Check-in

Pull up those balances!

Let’s Throw Some Money at Our Problems: July 2014 Check-in

It's time to check in on our debt payments and savings goals again. If you're joining us for the first time, you can read about our decision to publicly keep track of our debt here.

College Is Expensive and the NY Times is ON IT

Yes, even the Gray Lady has seen fit to write about how soaring student loan debt makes it hard to get housing in New York City.

It would be easy to dismiss the whole exercise, especially because it refers to “real estate maturity” as a state of existence to which human beings should aspire, and because it reports both the breed and name of a frustrated apartment-seeker’s dog. However, for a piece of non-news reported by the New York Times, the article paints a refreshingly varied portrait of post-collegiate financial distress. After first introducing us to Tierney Cooke, the dog owner who finds living with roommates intolerable (“I couldn’t take it. They were all in college.”), the Times also presents the tales of a mother of a two-year-old and a marvelously disillusioned chemist.

There is truly nothing surprising in the fact that housing in one of the most expensive cities in the country is hard to get in the midst of long-term economic trends that send personal debt up and wages down. But the chemist, Joseph Trout, a former foster kid from Philly who made good, is a font of excellent financial advice for an era of scarcity.

How a Young Australian Does Money

I’m living in Brisbane, the great Australian city known for its exorbitant public transport fees and terrifically muddy river. I’ve been here since I moved out of my parent’s home at 17, figuring out how to do money—first on a trainee wage, then as a student, and now as a part-time worker.

Let’s Throw Some Money at Our Problems: September 2014 Check-in

It's time to check in on our debt payments and savings goals again. If you're joining us for the first time, you can read about our decision to publicly keep track of our debt here.

Let’s Throw Some Money at Our Problems: June 2014 Check-in

It's time to check in on our debt payments and savings goals again.

Let’s Throw Some Money at Our Problems: November 2014 Check-in

It's time to check in on our debt payments and savings goals again.

The Vote That Could Cut Your Student Loan Bills

Student loan debt is exploding. It has grown so much and so fast that it not only crushes millions of young people, but it also has started to weigh down our entire economy. Total nationwide student debt now stands at $1.2 trillion, more than the total credit card debt owed by everyone in America.

Link Round Up: Student Loans and More Student Loans; Millennials Hoarding Cash Like Dragons

President Obama’s move to help ease the student loan crisis started a cascade of think pieces about student loans over the weekend. Here are a couple of the most interesting:

Here’s Why the Student Loan Market Is Completely Insane, via Businessweek. Complete with charts! Oh, and facts, lots of sobering facts:

Default rates at such places as Stanford, Duke, Carnegie Mellon, MIT, and Yale are all less than 2 percent. Not surprisingly, graduates from these schools command high salaries in the job market. At such places as West Virginia, Louisville, South Florida, and Boise State—schools much better known for athletics than academics—default rates are 10 percent. Further down the food chain are much higher default rates at places such as Alcorn State (16 percent), Colorado Technical University (23 percent), University of Phoenix (26 percent), Lincoln Technical Institute (30 percent), and Arizona Automotive Institute (42 percent).

+ Finding Shock Absorbers for Student Debt, via the NYT, also concerns itself with the problem of default, and wants to help cushion students against the risks they incur by paying for college.

The core problem with student debt is that we don’t adequately insure students against the risk of investing in college. While a vast majority of undergraduates have borrowed much less than some headlines suggest — in one study from the last decade, 98 percent borrowed less than $50,000 and four out of 10 borrowed nothing at all — millions are in default or behind on payments. With damaged credit records, they face higher interest rates on car and home loans, rejected rental applications and lost job opportunities. … But how can we help in the short term? We should allow student-loan payments to rise and fall with income, as we do with Social Security and taxes. If borrowers hit a tough spell, payments should drop automatically. If they score well-paying jobs, payments should rise. This is called “income-based repayment.”

+ Perhaps all of this has something to do with why millennials are hoarding cash like dragons?