38 Roommates in 10 years

I moved out of my parent’s house in the fall of 2005, and since then I have moved 19 times and had 10 different mailing addresses.

Was It Worth It? The Craigslist Coffee Table

I want to tell you about my things, specifically how they’ve held their value and what they're worth to me. From big-ticket items and impulse buys, down to a pen or cat toy, I’m fascinated by how everything holds some degree of value over time.

Soon We’ll All Be Somebody’s Roommate

In a country of stagnant incomes and rising costs of living, cutting costs often means having to find an affordable city to live in, but more commonly, it means finding roommates to split the rent.

House of Squirrels

I could hear a scratching sound as I moved some of my things into my bedroom from the living room. Matthea nodded. "Yeah, there are squirrels that live in the storage closets." She gestured to two small doors facing each other on opposite sides of the living room. "Just don’t ever open those doors because then they’ll run out." I nodded. It was my first apartment and I didn’t know anything about squirrels yet.

Here Is Your Open Thread

Here is your open thread.

Places I’ve Lived: Detroit Edition

We lived in a brownstone off of Eight Mile in a decidedly not dangerous and predominantly gay area. To the west of us, houses began to fall in on themselves and the night became progressively darker. The streetlights were out.

Tales of Eccentric Landlords

I never met the landlord at my first rental. My first week in the U.S. was spent in the fog of jet lag, hormones, and tears that came with moving halfway around the world only to find that you kind of forgot to find somewhere to live. I spent a week going from one house to another with growing desperation, trying to choose between the woman who wanted me to sleep in her living room and the landlord who promised he'd finish the kitchen "soon" and forbade overnight guests. I found a good house, took the room, and came back to sign the lease the next day only to find that the toilet had been removed. Everything was awful, until Chris showed up, quietly carried all my bags up the stairs, built my bookcase, and put me with a minimum of fuss into a house of messy, friendly stoners.

On Living Cheaply in Los Angeles, Or Trying To

I knew from the beginning that I wasn’t in love with the apartment. The living room space was nice in theory, but difficult to appreciate under its permanent cover of the other girls’ stuff and clutter. My bedroom was at the end of a long, narrow hallway, with one high, small north-facing window that provided dingy light in the mornings, and none at all by noon. There was no built-in storage, and the ancient stove ran cold, with one reliable burner and two that never worked at all. The backyard, which had seemed charmingly ramshackle when I first saw it on a nighttime tour, turned out to be brown and barren, and the front porch was filthy with years’ worth of dust and dog hair.

The Year We Saved $10K: It Was 2008 and California Was on Fire

After a summer of sharing our “the year we saved $10K” stories, we are reaching the end. Here are two more stories to share: one from Emma, who has a finance blog of her own called Let’s Talk About Money, and one from Irene, who saved money by fighting fires.

Emma: I save $12,000 every year, and have since I got my first job out of college. I do this by:

- living with roommates in a not-so-great neighborhood - rarely eating out or buying new clothes - rarely traveling (I go on yearly vacations but never anything over $1000 for two people) - driving a used car that I paid cash for

Right now, in my current job, after I put my $1000 into savings, that leaves me $800 to pay rent, food, bills, insurance, etc. I have a liberal arts degree and work in marketing/content creation.