How Apartment Hunting Is Different From Shoes Shopping

What becomes immediately obvious, when you start apartment hunting, is that there are no apartments.

Mother’s Day Chat: Is This Holiday Weird Or The Weirdest?

I think Mother’s Day is *weird* and I don’t know how to celebrate it except as a daughter.

Talking to a Millennial Homeowner

My friend Mo Hayes and her husband Jeff fall into this dual category of Millennials and homeowners. In fact, the two of them bought their home while Mo was still in college. What prompted them to join the 33.3 percent of Millennials who are homeowners? I asked Mo about her decision.

Food Cart Entrepreneurs, Maple Syrup Mafias, & More

"In my first two years of the food cart, people said that I’d reached the American dream. But I didn’t know what that was so I Googled it."

“Come On, Move In! It’ll Take You 5 Minutes!”

Choice quote: "This is a bathroom and a home office." Very efficient.

A Honeymoon Remembered in Receipts

A story in receipts.

“Just Quit”: How To Retire Early & What To Do Then

Americans' biggest expenses are the ones to cut back on: housing, transportation, and food.

Best Possible Use of a Vacant Lot?

What’s the best possible use of a vacant lot? Besides a tiny house, of course. A vertical farm!

Now, this is not an obvious answer, especially not in Jackson, Wyoming, where tourists swoop in and out like birds and a vacant lot can go for $1 million. But it is a potentially exciting one.

the town is about to become home to one of the only vertical farms in the world. On a thin slice of vacant land next to a parking lot, a startup called Vertical Harvest recently broke ground on a new three-story stack of greenhouses that will be filled with crops like microgreens and tomatoes. 

“We’re replacing food that was being grown in Mexico or California and shipped in,” explains Penny McBride, one of the co-founders. “We feel like the community’s really ready for a project like this. Everybody’s so much more aware of the need to reduce transportation, and people like to know their farmer and where food’s coming from.”

The small plot of land is owned by the town, and the building that houses the farm will be owned by the town as well, as part of a partnership. The founders spent five years working with the city to fully vet the idea—from how well the business model can support itself to how the efficient the new building will be.

Even better: 

Uber and PDX: A Not-Exactly-Love Story

two of the giants of our age, Portland, OR, and Uber, duking it out for dominance