Here Is Your Open Thread

— Companies that provide their employees with perks like catered lunches and workout classes have also created a role for people to manage those perks. The WSJ has a profile of one of those people in that role: Jen Nguyen, the "head of workplace" at Pinterest.

Here Is Your Open Thread

— From The Washington Post, examining companies that have policies geared towards work-life balance.

Here Is Your Open Thread

Tamar Adler, in The New York Times Magazine, on cooking and eating when it's just you at the dinner table.

Here Is Your Open Thread

In The New Republic, a case against office snacks (provided to employees for free as a perk):

In fact, employees may not even fully register that they are consuming office goodies—in part because they are so convenient. When it comes to snacking, we are especially bad not only at self-control, but also at knowing how bad we are at self-control. In one recent study, 40 adult secretaries were offered chocolate in various degrees of proximity. As the chart below shows, they ate more candies when the candies were visible and near, and only slightly fewer when they had to get up to get the candy but it was still visible. This tendency to eat more when the sweets are near seems obvious, but the tendency to eat more was fuelled by quantitative misperception: The secretaries also tended to underestimate their consumption when the candy was close and to overestimate how much they had consumed when it was farther away.

Also: The snacks at Tumblr, where Meaghan used to work, is “stocked with granola bars, chips, yogurt, fresh fruit and veggies, cold brew coffee, and a seltzer machine.”

I’d be totally cool with over-snacking on veggies and seltzer.

Photo: Nate Grigg

Here Is Your Open Thread

He said they’re also planning to innovate on Halloween night. Turned off by the people who came to their door last year, many of them adults or kids in street clothes, and few who said “trick or treat,” he decided to try something new: candy tiers. This year, they’ll reward those who play by Halloween’s basic rules — wear a costume, say “trick or treat” and be more or less a kid — by giving them pretty good candy. Those with amazing costumes will get better sweets. Those who don’t dress up at all or are of voting age or older will get a consolation prize: Dum Dums, which our neighbor considers the dregs of the candy pile.

— Roxana Popescu, in the New York Times, talking about a neighbor’s tiered candy-giving system this Halloween.

Photo: Vicki Watkis

Here Is Your Open Thread

From Gothamist: "Life Inside a Brooklyn Squat."

And Here Is Your Open Thread

— From Jake Halpern's New York Times Magazine piece on the dark, lucrative world of debt collection.