Going “Gluten Free” is for Rich People

The author quotes one of the nation's foremost gluten specialists and celiac doctors, whose diagnosis is that the gluten free phenomenon is not nearly as much about health as it is about class.

Our Tendencies to Procrastinate

In the New Yorker, Maria Konnikova looks at the research behind procrastination and finds that those of us who are most likely to procrastinate have impulsive tendencies, or a lack of self-control—which makes sense.

RIP Malls

Malls are dying, or so claim certain real estate barons quoted on the New Yorker's Currency blog this week.

The Man Who Made ‘Catan’ While Hating His Day Job

Adrienne Raphel has a really lovely profile of Klaus Teuber, a dental technician from Darmstadt, Germany who designed games in his basement during his spare time. One of those games ended up taking off and later designated by Wired as "The Monopoly Killer." Teuber's game: The Settlers of Catan, which I've only gotten to play once but found it really fun.

The Work and Money-Related Secret Fantasies of Adults

Our very own Jazmine Hughes is in the New Yorker magazine being brilliant about our secret fantasies as grown-ups, which have far less to do with sex than with work and money:

UNLIMITED TIME OFF FROM WORK FOR VARIOUS PRESSING MATTERS “Excuse me, boss?” you say, as you knock on an already open door, since your company believes in open-door policies, catered lunches, and summer Fridays. She—it has to be she, because you’ve always worked for a woman—looks genuinely happy to see you, and encourages you to take some freshly cut fruit, because you live in a place where harvests are bountiful. “Take as much as you want!” she says. “The harvests were bountiful!”

You don’t hesitate with your request. “I noticed this morning that I’m getting pretty behind on my issues of The Economist,” you say. This is not a lie. You regularly read The Economist, and you find typos every time, too. “Could I have a few days off to catch up?” Your boss gives you ten, and some more fruit. …

TRADER JOE’S PEANUT-BUTTER CUPS GO ON SALE “Marked down to $3.50? I better get two!”

A MEET-CUTE, WITH PERKS You’re walking down the street, furiously tapping away on the screen of your Latest Coolest Phone model, when you bump into an actual model, one not famous enough to place but well known enough that your nemesis, whom you haven’t seen since third grade and who walks by at this exact moment, does a double take. The model apologizes, and holds out his somehow muscular hand for a handshake. You two stand on the street and talk easily, like old friends or familiar neighbors who talk to each other only in the elevator, and he eloquently explains to you the difference between a traditional I.R.A. and a Roth I.R.A.

To this, I can only add, “free Diet Coke in the office,” “someone really old who lived a full, happy life dies and leaves me all their frequent flier miles,” and “Babygirl teaches herself to read, preferably while figuring out how to use and clean the potty, leaving me free to write novels and/or watch British miniseries.” Also maybe “waffles burn calories.”

Job of the Day: Former Beekeeping Brand Ambassador

Okay fine I am going to watch this documentary. While applying one of the thousands Burt's Bees products I get in my stocking for Christmas every year and then never use, because chapstick is a scam.

“Welcome to the paradise of the modern artist.” – An Interview With Tom Toro, ‘New Yorker’ Cartoonist

I met Tom in English class during my sophomore year of high school, and we became acquaintances and occasional friends. Mostly, I had a crush on him. After high school, I moved out of the Bay Area and to the East Coast, where I received sporadic updates on high school friends from my good friend Julia. She mentioned something about Tom drawing for the New Yorker, a piece of information I filed away until I saw this cartoon posted on Facebook.

Letting Go of Our Loyalty to Certain Brands

How brand loyal are you?

The Catalogs Keep Coming

You'd think that online shopping would have eliminated our need for catalogs, but according to the New Yorker, Americans receive nearly 12 billion catalogs a year—the worst of which is from Restoration Hardware, which has the door-stopping weight of 17 pounds and the ire of UPS delivery people. Most of the catalogs end up in the recycling bin, and are considered a waste of energy and resources.

Graham Crackers For Everyone!

Andrew Solomon writes for the New Yorker's Currency blog about Honey Maid's new ad campaign, and when following the ad money means that in some states, advertising is more progressive than public policy. I think Solomon puts it best here: "I’d prefer that people such as I get our rights because we command respect and evince dignity, but if we get them because there’s money in it, that’s fine."

Stop Thwarting Yourself With All That Positivity

In today's edition of Convenient Theories for Me, Weekly, Adam Alter at the New Yorker's Currency blog outlines why 'thinking positive' tricks your brain into complacency and keeps you from achieving your dreams: