Walking the Dogs of the Rich

The first dog was named Gucci. As Justin, my trainer (as if I were some kind of dog too!), told it, it was because Gucci's owner wanted to advertise that she'd spent as much on him as on a designer handbag. Gucci was definitely cuter than a handbag, but a lot less practical. Bernese Mountain dogs are built to survive in the Alps, and a high-elevation Financial District apartment in New York City is hardly the same thing. Coaxing Gucci into the elevator, and keeping him from barking long enough to hustle across the marble lobby and out the service entrance, was an act of sheer will that I tried to muster and brute strength that I certainly lacked.

Samantha Irby’s American Dream

Writer, comedian, and Chicago native Samantha Irby came to New York last week to read from her debut book of essays, Meaty. On her much-loved blog Bitches Gotta Eat, Irby shares "what i learned about new york during my first ever trip there last tuesday."

Lots of Mattresses on Lots of Floors, And a Bunk Bed That Smelled Like Italian Food (New Yorrrrrkkkkkk!)

Julie Buntin has lived in some places.

‘Good Things Disappear And Bad Things Take Their Place’

Emily Gould has written a really wonderful thing about New York and class and debt and food and hot sauce and winter—it’s great and you should read it. (“It’s cold here and a lot of people are awful. Good things disappear and bad things take their place. Rich people have too much power and they abuse it. The worst men you can imagine are fucking beautiful, talented women. Young people’s idealism and energy is siphoned off vampirically by exploitative bosses. Basic things are too expensive here, and expensive things are often offensively mediocre. Like the dinner we were eating. Or maybe I just wasn’t that hungry.”)

A Young Woman, From Providence to New York

Where have you lived, Jaime Green?

Airbnb is Illegal in NYC, But When There Are Dollars to Be Made…

Elizabeth Harris looks at the lucrative, but illegal (in NYC) Airbnb economy in New York, which I've talked a little bit before in regards to some of the lawsuits that have been filed. One woman says she rents out a room only while she is also occupying the apartment, and started doing it after she racked up some high medical bills during the recession—it's hard not to be sympathetic to that. [Meanwhile, in San Francisco...]

Places I’ve Lived: A Move to New York and an Assortment of Roommates

There was no communal space in the apartment other than the bathroom and kitchen (the owner had her own private bathroom), so I often felt like I was in a boarding school/convent/orphanage.

$12 Guac? Yes, $12 Guac

In New York, Rebecca Flint Marx explores why guacamole is so expensive, and discovers that maybe it isn’t so expensive after all. In fact, maybe those of us who scoff at $12 guac are ACTUALLY just racist and terrible: “Part of our expectation that guacamole is expensive may also come down to the pervasive and unfair assumption that, as [Empellón’s Alex Stupak] says, ‘anything Mexican should be cheap.’ The same diners who will fork over $23 for eggs Benedict or $40 for a bottle of wine that retails for $10, kvetch at the notion of paying more than $3 for a taco. As [La Newyorkina owner Fany Gerson] points out, ‘people have no problem paying $30 for a bowl of pasta, but if you go to a Mexican restaurant and they ask for $30 for mole enchiladas, then people [think] because it’s from Mexico it should be less.’”

A Few Ways S.F. Tech Can Work to Be Hated Marginally Less

Over on his blog today, Anil Dash offers a few timely “Stupid Simple Things SF Techies Could Do To Stop Being Hated.” He talks about how the New York tech community has escaped similar degrees of disdain and resentment because 1. Wall Street will always be worse, and 2. in New York, tech workers have a better “ethos of community involvement.”

His first suggestion is simple, but legitimate:

First, people in tech should use their voices to push the leaders of their companies and industry to do the right thing. It is just as easy for a CEO to ask the city to accommodate affordable housing as it is for them to demand tax rebates. And if a CEO believes their employees expect this kind of request, most tech company execs will do anything to keep their engineers happy. If Google is the symbol of entitlement in San Francisco right now, Larry Page could simply and consistently amplify the voice of those already working on housing solutions and make a huge impact.

Places I’ve Lived: Pittsburgh, New York, and the Secret of NYC Real Estate

Where have you lived, Megan Etzel?

New York is Expensive, But Not As Expensive As Before

New York is still pricey.

Bloomberg Announces the Winning Design for His Micro-Unit Dreamhouse

Would you live in one if you were looking for a single space in Manhattan? In theory, it looks great.