Can We End Tipping Culture?

In cities where the minimum wage has been successfully raised, restaurants are increasingly considering abolishing tips altogether.

Full-Time Dad, Part-Time Uber Driver

My primary responsibilities as a stay-at-home dad of three consist of breaking up toddler fights before they go from hilarious to incapacitating and somehow finding a way to pay half of our household bills. To do the latter, I’ve held a variety of part-time and odd-hour jobs.

Winner-Take-All Economics

The Amazon story can be replicated at all sorts of companies that haven’t yet received the Times treatment.

Our Current Economy, Decades in the Making

The gig economy was jumpstarted a long time ago.

Taxi Cab Confessions

In San Francisco, you can hail a yellow cab with an app, and when the cab pulls over, the driver may say, like mine did tonight, “Hello, how are you? I’m not doing well.”

Undercompensated in Academia

I grew up in an academic household, and academia was a goal of mine from an early age. Both my parents are musicians teaching in academia, and while I also loved to perform, I had decided in college that I would probably follow in my parents’ footsteps and pursue teaching on a university level.

Domestic Work and Tipping in Tanzania

When I first moved into my current house in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania’s commercial capital, my roommate had recently become a godmother to four puppies.

Starbucks’ #RaceTogether Makes Unrealistic Assumptions About Both Race and Work

#RaceTogether is based on a fictional idea of how we can all solve racism over a cup of coffee, but it’s also based on a fictional idea that baristas have the time to have these conversations in the first place.

The Year America Gets a Raise

The savings rate among Millennials is at negative 2 percent, partly due to stagnant wages coupled with increases in fixed costs. A bad labor market—lots of low-wage work available, but not enough ones with decent pay—have caused many young people to work multiple jobs. As Carl E. Van Horn, director of the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers, told the Times: “The only cure for young people in this position is an economic recovery of robust proportions.”

Waiting for That One Job

A few years out of college, my younger brother has been unable to find a full-time job working in early childhood education, so he has cobbled together employment with three part-time jobs: working with pre-schoolers at a private school, doing administrative work at a non-profit, and retail work. He lives at home, and the majority of his money goes to car payments, health care and student loans. “I’m trying to save, but it’s hard,” he told me. He was mostly at his a-few-dollars-above-minimum-wage retail job during the holidays, working early shifts in the stock room (“people buy a lot of stuff, and then they return a lot of stuff,” he explained). I bought him dinner and we talked about his career prospects. “I’ve been looking for that one job, but it hasn’t appeared yet,” he said. “I’m mostly just tired.”