Riding the Greyhound from San Diego to Las Vegas

I received an offer my meager budget and wandering nature would not allow me to refuse: A 664-mile round-trip on the Greyhound bus from San Diego to Las Vegas for $62.50. Even if I had to pay for a post-bus ride tetanus shot and sputum culture on account of Greyhound’s supposed dreadful conditions, the ticket was still just half the cost of driving. Plus I’d have eight hours of nothingness each way, which was almost unheard of in the two years since I went on an unexpected reproductive binge that resulted in two off-the-chain baby boys in just over 18 months. To the Hound I went.

What We Left in the Vilnius Airport

“You are entitled to one 15 kg bag each,” said the lady. “But this bag is 30 kg. The charge for the extra weight would be $450."

Here’s What You Spend on Transportation Each Month

What we spend to get around.

So Long, Sedan; Hello, Bus

I’m not suggesting everyone sell their Buick for a bus pass, or that buses are a far superior way of traveling. But once upon a time, I had to sell my car to pay off some traffic tickets and ended up having to rely on Kansas City's public transportation system to get around.

Commuting to Work and Not Feeling Miserable About It

The common denominator in this WSJ story about what makes commuting to and from work enjoyable (despite the time it takes) for people is having things to do to make the trip feel more efficient. A six-year study of nearly 30,000 British rail passengers found that 37 percent fewer passenger felt like their time was being wasted during their commute in 2010, compared with 2004, and researchers hypothesize that mobile devices that have allowed me to do things like check email, or listen to podcasts or music have helped commuters feel like they're being more productive.

Carpooling

I'm always interested in hearing about how people get around in various cities. When I was in S.F., I came across a lot of people who didn't own cars, and if they did, they said they carpooled to save money on gas and tolls, and, sometimes, to get to a more desirable BART stop. This piece in the San Francisco Chronicle about carpooling is a nice snapshot of this.

How Much Do You Spend on Transportation Each Month?

This week we're asking: How much do you spend on getting around each month?

Dubai’s Incentives to Create Safe Drivers

Authorities in Dubai are trying to make their roads safer by offering drivers prizes and points for avoiding traffic violations for extended periods of time, including the ability to use their points to negate any "black points" accrued on their record, and the chance to win a new car.

Maybe Taxis Won’t Not Stop Now

Stacy-Marie Ishmael talks to WNYC New Tech City host Manoush Zomorodi about apps that hail cabs for you in NYC and why, despite slow growth and popularity, they are very promising for minority communities, specifically, as Ms Ismael says, "brown people": "It takes away the possibility that you're not going to want to take me somewhere because you think I live in the outer boroughs or you're discriminating on the basis that you think I'm going to rob you, or you think I'm going to be committing some random act of vandalism based on your profile of me."

A Citi Bike Experiment

Filmmaker Casey Neistat decided to conduct an experiment where he'd commute to his office via taxi, via personal bike, and via Citibike, and then compared the three commutes based on criteria like cost and time.

Driving a Cab: The Best Working Class Job There Is?

Quite good: Victoria Hannan’s portraits of London cab drivers, with stories. My favorite: Ray (pictured above). “Ray’s been driving cabs for 16 years. He thinks it’s the best working class job there is and that there aren’t many others that let you work every day of your life if you want to.”

A job that lets you work every day of your life = best job. :(

(Another favorite woke up at 4 a.m. everyday for three years to study The Knowledge, “a test which has been described as a bit like having a mental atlas of London in your head.”)

I Am a Bike Person Now

Early last spring, my friends told me to call my car insurance company and negotiate a discount when my rates shot up by 85 percent. I thought about calling some customer service department and asking for that, or worse: shopping around, getting multiple quotes, really optimizing my deal. Instead, I sold my car.