Fun! An “Are You A Gentrifier?” Quiz

If you move to one of the few neighborhoods you can afford and, in so doing, unintentionally contribute to the raising of rents in your area, are you a gentrifier?

Gentrification Is Big Business

Some people flips houses; Goldman flips neighborhoods.

Gentrification Turns 50! Aristocratization Turns 6

The city that once turned on its aristocrats and fed them to guillotines has decided, again, to take a stand against rapacious, unchecked capitalism.

The Forces of Gentrification

We often ask whether gentrification is bad or good. Retenanting, it seems, is part of the bad aspects.

A Drunk Stole My Kale. You Won’t Believe What Happened Next!

OK, Gentrification is Lousy. Now What?

The problem, ultimately, is capitalism. It is a system designed to channel goods to the people willing and able to pay the most for them, including real estate.

“Behind Every Jane Jacobs Comes Giuliani with his Nightstick.”

Mueller’s painting with too broad a brush. Not so much a broad brush, even: a flamethrower.

Telling Stories About Appalachia: An Interview With Adam Booth About Poverty Culture and Storytelling

Adam Booth is a native Appalachian and professional storyteller who teaches Appalachian Studies at Shepherd University in West Virginia’s Eastern Panhandle. This spring, I saw him speak at a session on new Appalachian stereotypes at Marshall University, where he discussed moving away from the pop-cultural barefoot-and-pregnant image, and into a reclamation of traditional practices and crafts like canning, foraging, square dancing, and quilting. Booth characterized the young people in their 20s and 30s who are doing much of this reclaiming as “Super Appalachians” who make themselves vessels for their cultural heritage. Immediately I knew who he was describing—and they reminded me of people I know in Brooklyn. I started thinking about the rising popularity of old-time culture in both urban and rural areas across the United States, and got in touch. We spoke by phone about Appalachian identity, the fetish for poverty culture, the popularity of story slams, and the coal economy.

Embracing Change in San Francisco

Gary Kamiya has written a thoughtful and provocative, though reasonable, essay about gentrification and the fate of San Francisco. Kamiya, while fearing that his city will turn into another Manhattan, argues that the city will change, as cities do, and rather than creating a futile us vs. them dynamic, we should accept the inevitable and maybe cool it on the preemptive class war.

Detroit Would Rather You Not Take Pictures of Its Ruins

I called Philp to ask him what people like me, outsiders with no knowledge of the city and getting this constant barrage of ruin-porn and gentrification panics, should know about what it’s like to live there.