Painless Guides to Paying Off Your Car

This post is sponsored by Kia.

The Megan Method — Overpay, Then Sell

My first car was a wonderful, amazing, dark green faux-wood-interior-paneled convertible. I bought it outright from a lady in the neighborhood, and I used all my savings—$5,000.

When that car broke down, I bought another car, this one from my “car guy.” I traded my car in to him and financed the rest—$4,000.

I got a loan through the credit union, and overpaid each month so that I could pay it off early and avoid some interest. But now I need to replace my brakes and my air conditioner—to the tune of $2,200, which I will not be doing. I’ll sell it as-is and pay off the remainder of the loan and start over. Not with a used European car. Never again with a used European car.

Doing the Test-Drive at Home

Netflix brought movies to your house, and a Seattle-based startup named TRED would like to bring cars you’re interested in buying to your house for you to test-drive, to see how it fits in your garage, etc. This is fine! But is it really necessary? It seems to solve a non-problem, which is having to go to a dealership to test out a car and see if you like it, but I suppose if you don’t have a ride to get to a dealership in the first place, this could be your answer.

Quick Chat: Car Buying

Max: Mike Dang—quick Q. Do you know any trusty source about buying cars?