“We Thought Our Pay Would Be Higher” –Bankers

Theory: Expecting X and getting X+ = happiness; expecting Y and getting Y- = unhappiness, even if Y- > X+.

Yay, More Mommy Wars! Now With A Tax Twist

Instead of tax code changes that could be here one year and gone the next, I myself would prefer structural and societal changes in the way we support parents.

All the Single Ladies, Which is Everyone, Put Your Hands Up

Link Roundup!: Popcorn Secrets; Theme Weddings; Return of the King (Bloomberg)

In the Future, We Will All Understand Code

Citibike Not Earning Its Keep

New York City’s bikeshare system, while popular, is inching towards bankruptcy and bleeding more money every day. So what the hell is going on? One problem is that it’s popular with local users who get the yearlong passes with a much lower profit margin than the single-use passes intended to fund the system. The idea of visiting New York City and hopping on one of these bikes on a whim does seem like a bit of a stretch.

With, “How to Make a Bikeshare Fair and Functional” Jordan Fraade at the Baffler looks at the bigger picture:

The State With the Highest Minimum Wage Is Outpacing U.S. Job Growth

From Bloomberg, a look at the minimum wage debate via the state of Washington, which has the highest state minimum wage in the country.

Kitchen-related Gifts

I’m usually not much of a gift guide person, but I liked Megan McArdle’s gift guide for kitchen things because of how sensible it is (a $13 microplane grater is affordable and is something I’d actually would be happy to get). I also have a close friend who seemingly has everything, so my gifts to her are usually to take her out to dinner, but I once bought her a fish spatula for her birthday after remembering the one night we made dinner together where we ruined the fish using a regular spatula and it was kind of perfect. Plus, you could always get a nice oven mitt for the person who doesn’t like to cook, but likes frozen pizza.

The Way We View Debt

Via our pal Matt Levine, Bloomberg has an interview with Thomas Anderson, the author of a new book out called The Value of Debt. During the financial crisis, many households were overleveraged, which later resulted in a focus on de-leveraging and becoming debt-adverse (we got better at paying down our credit cards, for example, though that kind revolving debt is beginning to rise again). As you can see from his response above, Anderson argues that being too debt-averse is a mistake. He argues that it’s all about balance—pay off that high-interest, non tax-deductible debt first, but also hold onto some of your money in case you need it. Do what you need to do to remain secure, essentially.

Let’s Make a Price, I’ll Give You All of Ten Francs

Add this to the list of things people think about doing when they’re down to nothing and figuring out how to make some money: Sell your hair, or breast milk, or even kidneys on the black market (“kidneys” is one of the autofill options that come up when you type “I want to sell my” into Google search). But really, don’t sell your kidneys. The teenager who sold his kidney for an iPhone and iPad really regrets it.