The High Cost of Entering the Magic Kingdom

People still love Disney, attendance numbers are high, and tickets are now $99 for a one-day pass at its Magic Kingdom Park near Orlando, according to Bloomberg Businessweek. In 1989, adult tickets for Disneyworld were $30.65—$57.82 adjusted for inflation in today's dollars. Disney doesn't care about increasing prices because they know people will still pay it

Which Business Gets You to Swear on the Phone the Most?

An analysis of 1.2 million U.S. consumer calls from March 2012 to November 2013 by Marchex, a mobile advertising company, found that we are most likely to swear while on the phone with satellite TV providers, housing contractors, and cable providers. Here’s their full list:

1. Satellite TV providers – 1 in every 82 conversations 2. Housing contractors – 90 3. Cable providers – 123 4. Auto Repair – 144 5. Tow Truck – 159 6. Locksmith – 192 7. Storage – 214 8. Pest Control – 215 9. Heating & Cooling – 215 10. House Cleaning – 218 11. Lawn Care – 271 12. Carpet Cleaning – 275 13. Plumbing – 334 14. Home Buying – 411 15. Auto Dealers – 870 16. Flowers – 1,110 17. Property Management – 1,390 18. Hotels – 1,486 19. Senior Living – 1,742 20. Veterinary – 2,634

Our favorite swear word to say on the phone? The F-bomb, though sometimes we’re polite enough to wait until we’re on hold to let it out.

Photo: Frederic Bisson

Does Mexican Coke Really Taste Different From Coke Produced in the U.S.?

Mexican Coke has a small, but devoted slice of the Coke-drinkers market (a majority love Coca-Cola Classic, there are tons of Diet Coke admirers, and then there are the cherry and vanilla lovers). Mexican Coke uses real cane sugar (instead of the Coke in the U.S. which uses high-fructose corn syrup), and is bottled in small glass bottles—this for some people is all the difference. So much so that when the Mexican bottler of Coca-Cola let it slip that it was considering switching to high-fructose corn syrup to save money, fans of Mexican Coke expressed enough outrage to get the Mexican bottler to stick with cane sugar.

Unpaid Intern Can’t Bring Sexual Harassment Claim Against Supervisor; Not Considered Employee

Here's another terrible thing about being an unpaid intern (besides, you know, the whole unpaid part): Since unpaid interns aren't considered employees, Lihuan Wang cannot bring a sexual harassment claim against her former supervisor under the New York City Human Rights Law. According to Bloomberg Businessweek, the New York City Council "has had several opportunities to amend the law to protect unpaid interns but has declined to do so." Phoenix, the media company Wang worked for as an unpaid intern, says that their New York bureau chief Liu Zhengzhu no longer works for them, but says they never talked to him about any of the allegations.

Minimum Wage Numbers, Here and Elsewhere

Bloomberg Businessweek has a fun graphic looking at the minimum wage by the numbers in the U.S. and a few other countries.

Too Busy Counting Their Money to Care That You Hate Them

Think about the companies you love to hate: cable TV providers, cellphone carriers. It turns out that some of the most-hated companies out there don't care that you hate them because they're too busy going home to count all the money they're making.

Dates for Hedge Fund Lovers

If you like hedge funds, you'll like this new dating site. I think we're going to pass on this one!

What Various People in Various Industries Wear to Work

I basically tend to wear the same thing to work most days, but I'm interested in knowing how other people address what to wear to work, which is why I enjoy Bloomberg Businessweek's series on what people wear to work. Christopher Hines, a 23-year-old associate product marketing manager wears pants from the Gap and custom-made shirts from Hong Kong. Jolie Anne O’Dell, a 31-year-old tech reporter for VentureBeat wears a lot of vintage clothing she finds. California Pizza Kitchen CEO G.J. Hart wears blue jeans and Robert Graham shirts, which usually features bold patterns. [See the series from Arianne Cohen here.]

The iPhone as International Currency

Vernon Silver is a reporter for Bloomberg News based in Rome, and when an Italian worker heard he was visiting the U.S., she asked Silver if he could pick her up a gold unlocked iPhone 5s. She didn't want the phone for her own personal use—she wanted to resell it back on the Italian market for a small profit.

Can’t Afford to Buy, Can’t Afford to Rent

Is the rent too damn high? A Harvard study says yes, according to Bloomberg Businessweek.

Our After-work Routines

Bloomberg Businessweek asked various people at different companies what their after-work routines are.