What Do You Do If Someone Sells Your Instagram Selfie For $90K?

ArtNews calls Prince sexist, which feels apt to me: he’s taking self-portraits by young women and imposing his own subjectivity over theirs, turning them into commodities as well as objects at which he — and his other rich male art friends — can leer.

Does It Pay to Be an Artist?

How can artists even afford to make art?

The Cost of Things: Museums

Spend More on an Austen than Austen Herself Made in her Life!

Until recently, the poster languished in the bedroom, leaning against a wall like Jordan Catalano. Then Ben decided that Something Should Be Done and started emailing auction houses.

Why You Shouldn’t Go to Art School

students would be well served to avoid the New England Institute of Art, a private for-profit college, where the typical net price is $29,700, median debt is $30,600, 16 percent of borrowers default on their loans, and just 36 percent of students graduate.

Chatting With Artist Darren Bader About His Donation Boxes at the 2014 Whitney Biennial, Cats and Money

I interviewed artist Darren Bader over email as he prepared for his next exhibit at the Andrew Kreps Gallery, where he’ll have a show opening in the middle of May. We talked about his work, his current piece at the Whitney, and how a person makes money as a conceptual artist. We also talked about cats.

Who Will Buy the Only Copy of The Wu-Tang Clan’s Next Album?

The Wu-Tang Clan’s next album, “The Wu – Once Upon a Time in Shaolin” will be “available for purchase and ownership by one individual only,” reports ArtsBeat. This means that there will be just one album, and it can only be heard while the album is “on tour”.

Making Paper in a Paperless World: An Interview With Pulp and Deckle

Money As Art

Mark Wagner is a collage artist who uses dollar bills as his material. While watching this, I kept thinking, “ahh, isn’t it illegal to destroy currency?” (Yes.) But it’s art.

Three Tourists Bought Art From Banksy’s Anonymous Pop-Up Shop in Central Park This Weekend

On Saturday, an old man set up a stall in Central Park near Fifth Avenue selling “spray art” for $60 per canvas. He was able to sell a few canvasses to three tourists for a total of $420—which isn’t so bad for someone selling street art. Graffiti artist Banksy revealed that the stall was actually a one-time pop-up shop that belonged to him, and the New York Post reports that the art could be worth as much as $31,000.