Amazon Isn’t Spending Less Than It Earns, Either

If corporations are people—and, as we all know, they legally are—then Amazon is a person just like you and me.

That is to say: Amazon is spending more than it earns.

And, just like you and me, Amazon has plenty of reasons why it’s overspending. To quote Mashable: “Amazon is spending an incredible amount of money on a variety of investments that are not turning a profit. Well, not yet.”

Yes, the Amazon quarterly numbers are out, and although—as Geekwire notes—its net sales increased 23% to $19.34 billion for Q2 2014, the company also reported a quarterly loss of $126 million dollars.

I am having flashbacks to my own failed business and the cycle of thought in which I convinced myself first that I was “spending money to make money!” and second that as soon as I had one good month, I could start to pay back what I’d lost.

It’s amusing to learn that Amazon, just like you and me, is spending money to make money. (As a corporation wearing a people suit, it truly has picked up the local mannerisms and cognitive dissonances.)

Also, I suspect that despite this quarterly loss, Amazon is going to do just fine.

 

Photo: Stephen Woods

Maybe Don’t Buy Plan B Off of Amazon For $16.90

I love a bargain almost as much as I love affordable access to contraception, emergency and otherwise, but the good folks at RH Reality Check have looked into some of the vendors selling Plan B on Amazon and they are advising against getting in on the action:

The Case of the Missing Package

Mike: So I ordered a vacuum on Amazon the other day. It was delivered last night, but when I got home, it wasn't there. Someone stole the package.

Please Someone Buy This $200 E-Book

Via the Paris Review Daily’s roundup of very expensive ebooks, I bring you this gem, titled “The Amazon’s most expensive book (Arabic edition).” Behold the product description:

This book is one of the most expensive available on Amazon in Kindle version. It does not exist on paper version. It caters to the richest people. Those who can buy it without flinching. It is not for the poor, stingy, or for those who count their money.

Therefore, please do not buy this book if you do not have enough money on your bank account. If you are not wealthy but think you can read this book and ask for a refund afterwards, give up immediately, you are not the readership target.

Any unusual thing is expensive! This is the law of supply and demand. Only a privileged few can buy and read this book. The others: go your way. Many free books are available for your long winter evenings. However, if you have a lot of money, and if the price of this book does not disturb you more than that, welcome and good reading.

Of course my first instinct when I saw this was to gchat Mike Dang about it, to which he said:

Colbert Takes a Hachette to Amazon

Perhaps you’ve been following the Hachette Publishers vs. Amazon.com kerfuffle? Everyone from indie Brooklyn publishing houses to the Editorial Page of the New York Times has gone on record deploring the online behemoth’s slash-and-burn tactics. TL;DR: Amazon, which already controls about 50% of US book sales, wants even better terms from publishing houses, and is not above twisting arms to get its way. One guy who doesn’t like having his arm twisted? Hachette author Stephen Colbert. Who is, coincidentally, one comedian you don’t want to piss off.

Like John Oliver, Stephen Colbert took matters into his own hands, giving Amazon the finger (twice) on national TV last night, and then inviting on another Hachette author, the terrific Sherman Alexie, to commiserate. Together they promoted debut novelist Edan Lepucki’s California, because Hachette’s less-established writers are the real victims of this fight, telling audiences to show Amazon up by buying the book via Colbert Nation. Full clips below.

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Amazon And The Seasonal Worker

I think the title of this Guardian article speaks for itself: Homeless and working for Amazon: the trap of the seasonal job cycle. To be fair, Amazon is very upfront that they rely on a seasonal workforce, mostly because: Christmas.

Lush Cosmetics Names Shower Gel After Amazon Exec

Ooh hoo. As the Guardian reports, Lush's new line of Christopher North shower gel comes with the tagline, "rich, thick and full of it." Apparently, the cosmetics company asked Amazon to take down their misleading bath products, which were described as "lush" and designed to look a lot like Lush's own products, 17 different times before they filed a lawsuit. After three years of proceedings, a judge has ruled in Lush's favor, remarking that Amazon should not be allowed to "ride roughshod over intellectual property rights" in the name of technological development.

Amazon’s Movement from “Missionary” to “Mercenary”

At Harper's, James Marcus reviews Brad Stone's The Everything Store, a book about online retail giant Amazon and its founder, Jeff Bezos.

Amazon: Falling Out of Our Good Graces

But what about Amazon's mercenary business practices? Wasn't I turned off by that?

Amazon Prime and HBO: Two Great Tastes That Will Taste Great Together

Attention, nerds! HBO and Amazon Prime have announced a power-sharing agreement that is much more exciting than the one happening halfway around the world, so pay no attention to Fatah and Hamas. If you have a subscription to Amazon’s extra-special-bonus soon-to-be-$99-a-year service Prime, starting May 21, you will be able to stream episodes of the shows that put the Premium in premium cable:

It means access to HBO will no longer be limited to cable or satellite provider packages, opening the door wide for the first time to cord-cutters who’ve doubtless been waiting for a deal like this to go down. It means you’ll be able to tap HBO with anything that currently supports Amazon’s Prime channel — set-tops, tablets, phones, game consoles, etc. — and gain access to whole swathes of HBO content (as well as free two-day shipping and Kindle library lending) for Amazon’s standard $99-per-year fee.

Bear in mind, if you’re not a member, that Prime content is free to Prime members; this isn’t HBO signing up to let Amazon charge you to watch these shows. Amazon says Prime members will have “unlimited streaming access.”

Perhaps Amazon acceded in order to make its rate hike more palatable to its consumers. Perhaps HBO did because it wanted to give younger people, who are increasingly likely to eschew cable altogether, an option beyond stealing their parents’ HBO Go passwords. Who cares! More Sopranos and The Wire and yes even Sex and the City, without which I would have nothing to discuss with other straight women. Your move, Showtime.

Duh, Amazon is Bad For the Book Business

George Packer has a really long, really gossipy and great story about Amazon in the New Yorker right now. It is DARK, or it is dark if you love books and care about literary culture and are scandalized by things like this, even if you already knew it, but just to see it spelled out so clearly, my god.

Amazon Reviews As Market Research

Jason Feifer at Fast Company badgered his way into interviewing a very random and very successful online company he stumbled upon called C&A Marketing, whose business model is based on reading product reviews on Amazon and manufacturing products to fill in the gaps of what people want.