My Day Interviewing For The Service Economy Startup From Hell

I interviewed at Handybook in July 2013. My temp job had just ended and I was desperate for a steady job, and was relieved and excited when I got an email from Handy scheduling me for a phone interview.

Flight Delayed? Get That Money (Or 75% of It)

Henrik Zillmer has started a company to get you some money back from all those damn delayed flights. Or wait. Henrik Zillmer has started a company to get itself 25% of the money it gets you back. Capitalizing on our airline rage! Possibly brilliant. How it works: if your flight has been delayed for reasons other than weather or security, Airhelp will file a claim on your behalf and then take the airline to court if they reject the complaint. And they usually win. With 20,000 customers already, they've won millions of dollars in airline compensation.

What Kind of Tech Company is Kickstarter?

Well, as their former copywriter I could tell you in about 1000 different ways and at varying lengths and tone of voice, but that would be insane and probably unethical. Nevertheless, Kickstarter hit a big milestone this week: a billion dollars have been pledged to projects. From there, it isn't hard to figure out how much revenue they've made, and Quartz is on it:

Marijuana Paraphernalia for Discerning Tastes

"'Just looking at the marijuana industry holistically, there’s zero class,' Mr. Gordon said, referencing the pot leaf and rainbow aesthetic of yore.'" His company is called Rodawg.

Help, a Direct Mailing For a Cleaning Service Actually Worked On Me And I’m Worried It Will Ruin My Relationship

I am using the Billfold to tell you that I paid $29 to have someone come clean our apartment in a few weeks, the day before my mom is coming to visit.

And Then They Came For Our Sandwiches

The Problem With Profitless Startups, Kevin Roose's latest for New York Mag, talks about a thing I can't stop thinking about lately, decades too late: FAKE MONEY. Or to be specific, VC money inflating new businesses which [arguably] wouldn't otherwise succeed, and then go on to price out local/actual business who operate using more traditional business methods, such as selling goods and services for slightly more than they cost to provide. And then what?

Change The World With Your Sick Startup

Here is a WSJ article about how start-ups want to hire entrepreneurial-minded people. Makes sense to me. But the most interesting part of the thing is a quote from a guy named Roger Cosseboom, who is currently an engineer at 42floors but wants to start his own jam one day. HE SAYS: "It's kind of cheesy, but it's the best way to change the world a little bit nowadays."

Find The Next David Karp And Make Him Your BFF

This article from Harvard Business Review—"Six ways to befriend future tech billionaires"—is not about what I thought it was going to be about. I read that headline and couldn't click fast enough—yes, please, tell me how to be friends with people who will become very rich and then take me to the riviera. French. Italian. Any riviera.

Laundry Is a Problem That Will Never Be Solved

I mean yes but WHO CARES? I am not paying this kind man to design a website. I am paying him around $30 with tip to carry my laundry to his car, drive it around the block to his laundromat, and do my damn laundry. What I do not want, out of sheer principle, is to pay is a middle man with access to Photoshop (even one that gives me cookies with my laundry which, yes):

Movie Investing for Those With Deep Pockets

Putting up capital isn’t usually how corn-fed, dreamy-eyed boys and girls across America hope to break into the Entertainment industry. As of this week, though, it might be the most accessible way for them to do it. The New York Times reports:

A start-up, Junction Investments, plans to open for business on Wednesday, allowing wealthy individuals to invest in movies alongside veteran film financiers.

At the start, the company will offer an online chance to back “A Hologram for the King,” an adaptation of the Dave Eggers novel that will star Tom Hanks. Soon after, would-be mini-moguls will be able to invest in “Triple Nine,” a thriller featuring Kate Winslet, the “12 Years a Slave” star Chiwetel Ejiofor and Woody Harrelson.

The Junction Investments-backed films are films that will be made anyway, with or without your cash. They are not Tinkerbells that will die if you don’t clap, like the Veronica Mars movie, which became a three-dimensional manifestation of an audience’s enthusiasm after its on-a-whim launching on Kickstarter.

Job Opportunity Maybe, Wide Open Niche

I don't understand most of this article about how celebrities are making money in social media—brandspeak and social speak are like 2 totally madeup languages and when their powers combine ... But, the gist: Celebrities are making a lot of money in social media ("CEO Alan Chan says that some clients are making as much as $30,000 to $40,000 a month.") Maybe that means there are business opportunities out there for YOUNG PEOPLE who are NATIVE USERS. Get in on THE GROUND FLOOR of THIS EXCITING NEW INDUSTRY. Of Tweets.