Talking to Alan Lastufka About Starting DFTBA Records With Hank and John Green and What’s Next

While you might have heard of John or Hank Green, you may not have heard of DFTBA Records' other original co-founder, Alan Lastufka. When he announced in June that he was selling his stake and leaving DFTBA (an initialism for "Don't forget to be awesome"), I asked him if we could talk about his work with the record label as well as some of the financial lessons he learned while going from “artist and YouTuber” to “President of a successful business.” So, readers of The Billfold (and Nerdfighters!), consider this a special treat. A conversation with Alan Lastufka about his work on DFTBA Records, from co-founding the record label in 2008 to selling his stake in 2014.

Detroit Would Rather You Not Take Pictures of Its Ruins

I called Philp to ask him what people like me, outsiders with no knowledge of the city and getting this constant barrage of ruin-porn and gentrification panics, should know about what it's like to live there.

Talking With Andrew Rappo, the Elf from Christmas Cats TV

For three days this December, the internet got to experience the joy of Christmas Cats TV, a 9-to-5 live stream of an elf and a grandmother playing with cats, drinking from a flask, and listening to Christmas classics. How did this come to be? I tracked down the elf to ask him.

An Interview with Sara Knox Hunter on Founding and Funding a Discussion Residency

In 2011, Sara Knox Hunter founded Summer Forum, which takes the model of an artists’ residency and uses it to support reading and conversation. Each Summer Forum residency has a broad theme, assigned texts, invited guests, and a carefully chosen location, all of which serve as starting points for discussion. This year’s residency will take place from July 6 to 13 in Joshua Tree, California. The 34 residents (chosen from a pool of about 100 applicants) will sleep, eat, and attend the program for $350—one-third of the actual cost per person. Sara (who just moved to New York from Richmond, Virginia) and I (who live in Chicago) talked about Summer Forum over Skype.

What led to your starting Summer Forum?

Originally I was planning to finish my terminal master’s degree and then apply for a Ph.D. program in comparative literature. On my way to doing that, instead of picking a more traditional thesis focus, I started to look more at the institution and examined this specific publication called Profession [the Modern Language Association’s "journal about the fields of modern languages and literatures as a profession"].

I started looking at articles from the mid- to late-1970s and compared them with the academic articles that were coming out and all the mainstream press that academia was getting after 2008, and the issues were so similar: education is too expensive, we hire way too many adjuncts, we’re losing full-time faculty positions, we’re accepting too many Ph.D. students so that there are too many unemployed Ph.D.s once they graduate. It was pretty depressing to me. We keep talking about a crisis in education, but it’s really this ongoing slow drag.

So how did you come out of your thesis research thinking about something like Summer Forum?

At the same time, my partner, Michael Hunter, was going to different artists’ residencies. And a lot of my close friends are artists, and they would all go away for the summer. I was like, maybe there’s some way to create something discussion-oriented that utilizes that model, where you don’t have to be in grad school, you don’t have to commit to five-plus years for a Ph.D., you don’t have to pay for a terminal master’s program, but you can still have these opportunities for intense study and commitment with a group of people who are all curious and interested in discussing ideas and willing to commit a smaller amount of time and a smaller amount of money. That was my starting point.

A Conversation with Katharine Heller About Rollerskating and Filing Cats’ Nails, (aka Being a Professional Actor)

Whenever I order a beer, I wonder what that bartender would rather be doing, if her eyeshadow is actually leftover from a dress rehearsal for some off-off-Broadway play that might get a dozen audience members on a good night. I spoke with Katharine Heller, a former bartender and current actor/comedian/writer/podcast host about this transition from behind the bar to in front of the crowd. As she does in her podcast Tell the Bartender, she entertained me with stories about her comedy punk band Bitch Chicks on the Rag and filing the nails of cats with stagefright, all in the name of acting. We talked about how she pays her bills, the importance of stage combat, and how bartending made her a better actor.

Graphic Designer Explains Motivation Behind Craigslist Ad

Yesterday, a graphic designer posted an ad on Craigslist titled "Designer Looking For People To Do Their Job Without Pay (Anywhere)" which poked fun at people who post ads on Craigslist asking designers to do free work for them. I emailed the designer asking for a short interview. The designer, who goes by the name Mr. Furley, responded and was gracious enough to answer some of my questions. He was a wonderful curmudgeon.

How to Run an Indie Convention

When I talked to Oni Hartstein two weeks ago about her car that wouldn’t stop, she and I agreed it would be interesting to continue the conversation and talk about what’s really keeping her up at night: running the indie convention Intervention, which will be held this year in Rockville, Maryland from August 22-24.

Intervention is different from other geek-themed conventions in that focuses on how to create awesome stuff. It’s a bit like Maker Faire meets How To Network, with a few rock concerts thrown in. I’ve been part of Intervention every year since its launch in 2010, but I’ve never really talked to Oni about how she manages to run the show, year after year.

So that’s exactly what we did.

How a Wealth Manager Does (Other People’s) Money

As part of my journey to understand this situation better, I've been talking to people at all levels of wealth. One major goal is to find out how professional, active money management differs from the administration of the average middle class nest egg. To that end, I recently talked with a wealth manager for a large bank. Let's call him Tom.