How a Legal Secretary Who Paid Off $38,000 in Debt Does Money

Alison (not her real name) is a 27-year-old legal secretary who lives outside of Philadelphia.

How a Non-Profit Attorney Who Provides Legal Services to Low-Income NYC Residents Does Money

I'm a first year attorney at a non-profit legal services organization, in New York.

Second Shifts: Finding Extra Income in the Side Hustle

Talking with my friends in similar positions to mine, it started to seem like having a job and a half at 25-ish was the norm, or at least a norm, rather than an anomaly. According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in August 2014, about 6.8 million people held more than one job. A little over half of those, 3.6 million people, had a secondary part-time job in addition to a primary full-time job. Although multiple job-holders only make up just 4.7 percent of the employed population, that adds up to more than the populations of Los Angeles and Chicago put together. Even for those with non-essential side hustles, it's a response to wage stagnation, if nothing else; more is more, so work if you can get it.

How a 24-Year-Old Undocumented College Student Does Money

Giancarlo Tello is a 24-year-old New Jersey resident who peppers his Facebook feed with Yu-Gi-Oh! references, Magic the Gathering speak, and other geeky, pop culture talk. Bespectacled and somewhat unassuming at first glance, he comes off as a typical Rutgers University student.

How a Canadian Expat Family in Budapest Does Money

Currently our income does match our needs, and we are able to make a bit of savings. It's all complicated by the fact that both my husband and I are Canadian, and we are currently living in Budapest, Hungary and have been for approximately 4 years.

How a Young Australian Does Money

I’m living in Brisbane, the great Australian city known for its exorbitant public transport fees and terrifically muddy river. I’ve been here since I moved out of my parent’s home at 17, figuring out how to do money—first on a trainee wage, then as a student, and now as a part-time worker.

How The Toast Does Money

Gotta lay out all of my biases right away: The Toast has paid me to write stuff for them, I'm active in their comments section, and when the Vegas Valley Comic Book Festival (at which I'm performing in November) asked me to list my heroes as part of a Proust Questionnaire, I immediately said "Roxane Gay, Nicole Cliffe, Mallory Ortberg, Caitlin Moran." So we're all clear that I am ridiculously biased here, right? On to how The Toast does money.

How a Person Who Recently Transitioned Careers Does Money

I quit a pretty well-paying job in marketing at the end of April, kind of on a whim. I had about a year's worth of money saved up when I did that.

Unnecessary, Compulsive Frugality

I am not uniformly miserly. I allow myself the pleasure of good beer, periodic meals out at places where the entrees cost more than ten dollars, and, now and again, a vacation. But waste still feels deeply difficult.

Sometimes You Earn $0, Sometimes You Earn $10K: How an Actor Does Money

Gianmarco Soresi is an actor, writer, and stand-up comedian living in New York City. He’s the writer, producer, and lead of a show called <50%, a romantic comedy that just played at the New York International Fringe Festival and was one of only 21 shows chosen to have an encore run Off-Broadway. He’s the creator and star of a web series, An Actor Unprepared. And he has a regular gig in an Off-Broadway show called Clown Bar.
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