Working While Pregnant

Sometimes the Gray Lady does a good deed. I mean, she spends a lot of time preening, and baiting us with the travails of the city’s most obnoxious, narcissistic 22-year-old as he searches for a $3700-a-month apartment big enough to decorate like an Orientalist bordello, complete with a huge oil painting of himself. But sometimes she also manages to help an unfairly fired pregnant woman get her job back:

Ms. Valencia, who earned $8.70 an hour as a potato packer for Fierman in the Bronx, was told by her supervisors in August that she could not continue working unless her doctor gave her a full-duty medical clearance. (Ms. Valencia, who had a miscarriage last year, was told by her doctor that she should work only eight hours a day, no overtime.) Lawyers for Ms. Valencia said the company had violated New York City’s Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, which requires employers to make reasonable accommodations for pregnant workers. Her story was the subject of a Working Life column on Monday.

My god, what employers will try to get away with when they think nobody’s looking. Sadder still is that most of the time, nobody is looking. If you’re working while pregnant, know your rights.

 

My Life as a Magnolia Bakery Cupcake Bouncer

I was the first line of defense. Me. I was the gatekeeper and I was the key master.

Oyster Pirate, Cruise Director: Match the Writer to the Wacky Day Job!

Some of these Famous Writers’ Wacky Day Jobs I knew, and others somehow I did not. Anyway, if you haven’t clicked on the link yet, let’s do a quiz! Match the famous writer with his or her source of income:

A) Kafka

B) Salinger

C) Vonnegut

D) Bram Stoker

E) Steinbeck

F) Orwell

G) Melville

H) Nabokov

I) Jack London

J) Jack Kerouac

K) Harper Lee

L) Robert Frost

M) James Joyce

N) John Galsworthy

O) Conan Doyle

P) Dickens

Q) Dostoyevsky

R) Agatha Christie

S) William S. Burroughs

T) Joseph Heller

1. Car Dealer

2. Theater Critic

3. Tour Guide

4. Cruise Director

5. Imperial Police Officer

6. Curator

7. Bank Clerk

8. Law Clerk

9. Ticket Agent

10. Dishwasher

11. Oyster Pirate

12. Cinema Operator

13. Blacksmith’s Apprentice

14. Barrister

15. Teacher

16. Surgeon

17. Engineer

18. Factory Worker

19. Exterminator

20. Apothecary’s Assistant

Jobs I Had Before Getting My Novel Published

Here's a list of the (mostly crappy) jobs I had while writing nine novels before the tenth book got sold.

Job of the Day: Fake Patient

Trigger warning: this NPR article about playing doctor makes the assumption that we all want or could have a “job that we love.” That aside, it’s an interesting look at a very strange profession.

Some of us are lucky enough to stumble into a job that we love. That was the case for Gabrielle Nuki. The 16-year-old had never heard of standardized patients until her advisor at school told her she should check it out.

“I was kind of shocked, and I was kind of like, ‘Oh, is there actually something like this in the world?’ “

Since Nuki wants to be a doctor, the chance to earn $15 to $20 an hour training medical students as a pretend patient was kind of a dream come true. Every six weeks or so, Nuki comes to Maine Medical Center in her home town of Portland, Maine, slips on a johnny, sits in an exam room and takes on a new persona.

It’s not only good practice for the doctors and good money for the patients. This job could save your life. Occasionally the doctors discover that play patients have actual dangerous medical conditions: