News

Introducing, Ester

Some news!

---

Citywide Blight Due to Shady Donation Boxes

Have you ever seen or used one of those donation boxes placed in parking lots used to collect donated clothes, books, and shoes? Sam Levin reports at the East Bay Express that the boxes are often ill-maintained and usually run by for-profit businesses.

---

The New SATs

The Washington Post reports that a preview of the new SAT test is out and it actually sounds kind of better?

---

Here Is Your Open Thread

According to Quartz, 71 million people watched other people play video games last year, and many of them paid good money to do it at a live event.

---

An ATM, But for Cupcakes

New York joins cities like Dallas, Chicago, Atlanta, Las Vegas, and Beverly Hills that have a cupcake ATM—a place where people can go 24/7 to pick up a cupcake for $4.25 if they having a craving for one. The ATM is run by Sprinkles, and a robotic arm picks up cupcakes to deliver them in a compartment when a customer orders one. I’ll likely never use it, but you never know.

---

Finding a Lucky Break Recording Six-Second Videos

Michael and Carissa Rae Alvarado are a husband and wife folk-pop duo who recorded six-second clips of themselves singing on their Vine account. Their short covers soon went viral, and Billboard reports that the recording eventually landed them a record deal with Republic Records.

---

Diversity Hiring and the Concept of ‘Fit’

In the newsroom diversity debate, some of the criticism has centered around this idea: that the reason why these new media ventures have such monochromatic, sausagey mastheads is that they are insulated from the wider culture, and therefore dependent on mostly white, mostly male, and mostly coastal networks for their hiring needs.

---

In 2014 Our Government Is Still Filing Retirement Paperwork by Hand

In Boyers, Pa. there are 600 people who work in a limestone mine, but they’re not digging out natural resources or anything like that—they work for the Office of Personnel Management, and their job is to process the retirement paperwork of U.S. government workers. They work in a mine because they need the space, and they need the space because they need room for 28,000 file cabinets. Though it’s 2014, the majority of the paperwork is still processed and filed by hand. David A. Fahrenthold explains how this came to be in his appropriately titled story for The Washington Post, “Sinkhole of Bureaucracy.”

---

Running Away From Home and Spending Five Days Wandering NYC

Eleven-year-old Kareem Granton ran away from home and spent five days sleeping on the subway. He talked to New York magazine’s Katie Van Syckle about how he spent time his time and what he saw.

---

Teen Moves Back in With Parents

Rachel Canning, the New Jersey teenager who sued her parents for college money and $650 a week in child support has now returned home. According to The Daily News.

---

Lizard Heads, Frogs, Crickets: The Things We Find in Our Lunch Salads

Yesterday, a customer from a Manhattan chain restaurant found the head of a lizard in her salad.

---

Asia’s Richest Man Believes in the Future of Synthetic Eggs

In the future, “scrambled eggs” could be made entirely out of plants, and Asian’s richest, Li Ka-Shing, has so much faith in the company that’s developing the synthetic eggs, Hampton Creek, that he just led a $23 million investment round for the company, Wired’s Ryan Tate reports. The synthetic eggs currently taste a bit blander than real eggs, but cost 48 percent cheaper. The synthetic eggs may be especially important in China due to the country’s fast growing economy and the health scares over avian flu and antibiotics concerns. There are also potential environmental benefits if synthetic eggs take off and we rely less on chickens on factory farms.

---