Jobs

Beth Lisick On “Maybe This is My Thing!”

So this month’s Emily Books pick is a book of short, hilarious essays by Beth Lisick called Yokohama Threeway. Beth has written four books, hosts a monthly storytelling series, is currently on our with Sister Spit, does comedy with Tara Jepsen, is an actress, a slam poet, a mom. So when I gotto interview her for Emily Books, a lot of our discussion ended up being about work, success, failure, and trying to get by. I love what she had to say about all of it:

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Every Job I’ve Had: City Paper, Biking in Jorts, and The World’s Largest Design Firm

Washington City Paper, January 2011-November 2012:
I interned for Washington City Paper for all of 2010. It was unpaid, but I wrote a lot of blog posts that I still occasionally reference, and most of the things that I covered—public meetings in Southeast D.C.—I was planning to attend anyway as research for my senior thesis (about gentrification and displacement in a neighborhood called Anacostia).

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Have Fun With Those ‘Best Jobs’ Rankings

Earlier this week CareerCast, a global job search site, released its 2014 rankings of 200 jobs from best to worst (methodology here) and found mathematicians and tenured professors in the top 1 and 2 slots respectively, while newspaper reporters and lumberjacks hit the bottom of the list at 199 and 200.

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Going to the Bathroom at Work

This Atlantic article about the design of public bathrooms (or lack thereof), pee-fear, and the guy whose patients call him Dr. Pee but he doesn’t want them to call him Dr. Poop is my everything.

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Injured While Adjuncting

Linda Lee is a part-time faculty member who slipped on ice and fell at a university where she was teaching. She recently wrote an informative post at The Adjunct Project on worker’s compensation from the perspective as an injured adjunct.

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Now What? How Answering This Question Lead Us to Changing Everything (Part IV)

Everyone seems to have a way of summing up Los Angeles.

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Rides for a Dollar a Minute

I’d met the rickshaw boys the summer before. I worked in the fast food stand on the corner, sweating over the deep fryer in my company-issued apron and ball cap. They parked their rickshaws across the way, at the mouth of a pedestrian alley in the tourist-filled heart of historic downtown Ottawa. They came by a few times a day to refill their water bottles, flirt and beg for free slushies. We both stayed on our feet until bar close—I fed the drunks and they hauled them home—and once I got my fake ID I started joining them on their Monday nights out, the only night of the week that they took off work.

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Mayor de Blasio vs. Horse-Drawn Carriage Drivers (And Liam Neeson)

New York City’s mayor has long been pledging that one of the first things he would do upon taking office would be to rid the city of horse-drawn carriages, which has made both the drivers of said carriages and Liam Neeson very upset.

I will admit that when I saw that Liam Neeson had written an op-ed for the Times calling the proposed horse ban a “class issue,” I imagined his argument to be that such a move would unjustly affect rich people who live uptown and ride around in horse-drawn carriages. Then I remembered that that only happens on Sex And The City. So that was my first disappointment of the day, but here is what he actually meant:

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Other People’s Offices

Via The Paris Review: Paul Barbera’s “Where They Create” provides photos of “studios and work spaces of artists and writers” and he recently photographed The Paris Review offices (example above).

I am the kind of person who likes looking at the interiors of other people’s apartments (usually via the Times real estate section), but looking at all these work spaces is fascinating as well.

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The 35-hour Work Week

How much of a difference would it make for you if your workweek was cut to 35 hours?

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The Torture of Giving Critical Feedback at Work

ands down, my worst work experience to date was trying to tell someone they have a bad attitude. This someone was my coworker, Ruth, and technically, I was her supervisor even though we were the same age. My boss directed me to give her this feedback during her annual review. Ruth was actually terrific at many parts of her job, but according to my boss she had a “negative attitude.” It was a combination of an unfriendly and unhelpful demeanor (that I think was accidental, e.g. that she frowned when her face was at rest), and a tendency to avoid taking on additional work (mostly pretty boring stuff that I wouldn’t have wanted either).

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A Case Against Telling Your Coworkers What You Earn

While I don’t dispute the notion that transparency can prevent people from being underpaid, the chaos that can be caused by people sharing their salaries suggests that there needs to be a better way to share that information.

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