Houses

The Pros and Cons Of Collective Living

“The $1,000 federal Child Tax Credit, for example, is much less generous than the $7,500 federal tax credit for electric cars.”

---

It All Comes Out In The Wash: A Story Of Love And Laundry

Laundry in New York is even worse than regular laundry. You have to locate a laundromat, figure out what kind of money they take, haul your stuff there, come back in time to switch it before some angry weirdo tosses your intimates on the floor, lug it back home, and fold it. It can be a day-long saga and that’s if you have one nearby and it doesn’t require all quarters.

---

Own This B&B!

This news item seems to be going around like a wet cough. Maybe she’ll make her goal on semi-ironic hipster Lumbersexual entries alone.

---

Giving Up a House to Pay Off $63,000 in Credit Card Debt

Sleepless nights. A knot in the pit of the stomach. A gnawing sense of unease.

---

Today’s Rent-Saving Solution: Move Into An Old-Age Home

How long before someone options the rights to this story and turns it into a movie, or at least a sitcom?

---

‘Buying the Worst House in the Best Neighborhood Can Actually Backfire’

Oh, conventional wisdom. When it’s wrong, it’s not merely wrong. It can wreak havoc.

Quartz decided to test some of that good old conventional wisdom, specifically the adage that getting the worst house in the best neighborhood is a sound investment. The results were surprising. Or not, if you’re a determined skeptic.

we found that only rarely does the bottom 10% outperform the top 90% of houses in a ZIP code. On average, these bottom-tier homes do neither better nor worse than the others.

Looking at those numbers, we might have concluded that buying a neighborhood’s worst home is therefore a neutral investment strategy—a myth, but not a harmful one. It doesn’t maximize returns. But it doesn’t cost buyers either.

Then, however, we dug a little deeper—and we saw that buying the worst house in the best neighborhood can actually backfire. That’s because the more affluent a neighborhood is, relative to its greater metropolitan area, the worse the homes in its bottom 10% tend to perform.

In short, the nicer the neighborhood, the bigger the myth!

---

On Doing Everything Right and Still Making the Wrong Decision

Rural areas may have beautiful, inexpensive farmhouses on large plots of land, but they do not have a large influx of people trying to buy houses.

---

“Come On, Move In! It’ll Take You 5 Minutes!”

Choice quote: “This is a bathroom and a home office.” Very efficient.

---

A Guide to Maybe, Someday Buying a Home

The process of buying a home can seem overwhelming to those of us who haven’t gone through it before. So as any good millennial would do, I decided the first place to start my investigation would be with some good, old-fashioned crowdsourcing. I asked more than a dozen friends who’ve made the plunge in the past couple years about where to get started.

---