Culture

Is 75 Enough?

If you’d like mortality mansplained, this pedantic fellow in the Atlantic does an excellent job. (“Mortality: You’re Doing It Wrong.”) In the process of declaring that 75 is a perfect age to die, the author also declares himself against euthanasia / “death with dignity” movements for some reason and adds that he will have a memorial service before his death because wow is he a control freak. Yet, as the Dude would put it, the author is not wrong — at least not in his main point, that he won’t make any effort to extend his life past 75; he’s just kind of an asshole.

The good news is that we have made major strides in reducing mortality from strokes. Between 2000 and 2010, the number of deaths from stroke declined by more than 20 percent. The bad news is that many of the roughly 6.8 million Americans who have survived a stroke suffer from paralysis or an inability to speak. And many of the estimated 13 million more Americans who have survived a “silent” stroke suffer from more-subtle brain dysfunction such as aberrations in thought processes, mood regulation, and cognitive functioning. Worse, it is projected that over the next 15 years there will be a 50 percent increase in the number of Americans suffering from stroke-induced disabilities. Unfortunately, the same phenomenon is repeated with many other diseases.

So American immortals may live longer than their parents, but they are likely to be more incapacitated. Does that sound very desirable? Not to me.

He makes sound arguments for why trying to extend life past a certain point simply for the sake of it is silly and not cost-effective, especially when quality of life deteriorates and all we have to look forward to is that “second childishness, and mere oblivion” stage. (Which can be a serious financial and emotional burden on our children/care-givers.) I’m kind of convinced. But ask me again when I’ve reached his age: if I have also attained his level of success and feeling of supreme self-satisfaction, perhaps I too will be ready to Let It Go.

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Let’s Help FT Make Work Poetry Happen

Get excited: the Financial Times has launched a WORK-RELATED HAIKU CONTEST. (Registration required.) (To read the full article, not to submit to the contest.)

Here’s all the relevant info:

+ The haiku is a powerful poetic form, in three lines of 5, 7 and 5 syllables. David Lanoue, haiku poet and author, defines it as: “A one-breath poem that discovers connection,” and thinks of a senryu as a comic haiku. Keeping this in mind while you write will help you.

+ The deadline for submissions for the first week’s topic is noon GMT September 24. Please send entries to workplace.haiku@ft.com

+ The best examples of haiku will be narrowed down by FT editors, with a guest judge picking the winner each week. Judges have been nominated by British Haiku Society, the World Haiku Association, and the Haiku Foundation.

Come on, ‘Folders! This is so totally in our wheelhouse. I want to see you dominate like a squad of tiny, fierce Chinese gymnasts.

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Beauty Products Will Destroy You, & Not Just Financially

Because apparently we’ve gone from Feminist Socialist Revolutionaries around here, with Mike gone, to a Blog About Shoes, Dresses, and Cosmetics, here’s some delightful news: nail salons are germ-factories and lipsticks are full of lead.

It’s not just lead we’re slathering on our mouths, either. According to Mother Jones, a variety of lip-products tested contained all sorts of elements from the Periodic Table:

In a small study out last week, researchers asked a group of teenage girls to hand over their lipsticks and glosses and tested them for toxic metals, including lead and cadmium. Though metal content varied widely from brand to brand, they found that women who apply lipstick two to three times daily can ingest a significant amount—20 percent of the daily amount that’s considered safe in drinking water or more—of aluminum, cadmium, chromium, and manganese. Depending on the lipstick, in some cases women who slathered it on (14 times a day or more) were meeting or surpassing the daily recommended exposure to chromium, aluminum, and manganese. Lead, a metal that humans should avoid exposure to entirely, was detected in 75 percent of the samples.

Mother Jones, it goes without saying, doesn’t wear makeup. If you must, though: “The FDA’s 2012 test found less than one part per million of lead in Wet n’ Wild, Bobbi Brown, and Shiseido brand lipsticks.”

Great! Now what about our nails? They / we are doomed, too, according to the New York Observer

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Saying Yes to the Dress, Pt 2: KLEINFELD’S

Ringing the Universe Room were more racks of dresses than there are stars in the heavens: ivory dresses, cream dresses, dusky rose dresses, apricot dresses, even a couple of goth-style black dresses for effect. (No one tried them on.)

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The Liberal Arts Are Not a Luxury: An ‘Excellent Sheep’ Responds to Deresiewicz

Filling our history and literature classes with only affluent students means that we will rarely again turn out a Junot Diaz, an Alice Walker, an Irving Howe or a Sherman Alexie.

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Link Roundup!: Sleep You Need vs Sleep You Get; Podcast Love

+ Another way we are unequal in this paltry excuse for a civilization? The number of hours of sleep we get a night, on average, varies based on how much money we have. The effects are real, lasting, and frightening:

McCalman’s life reveals a particularly sorry side of America’s sleep-deprived culture. Though we often praise white-collar “superwomen” who “never sleep” and juggle legendary careers with busy families, it’s actually people who have the least money who get the least sleep.

Though Americans across the economic spectrum are sleeping less these days, people in the lowest income quintile, and people who never finished high school, are far more likely to get less than seven hours of shut-eye per night. About half of people in households making less than $30,000 sleep six or fewer hours per night, while only a third of those making $75,000 or more do. …

A later study on 147 adult humans found that the sleep deprived among them had actively shrinking brains. This suggests that no amount of “catch up” sleep can ever reverse the effects of sleep loss on the body.

“How do you sleep at night?” “On top of a pile of money with many beautiful ladies.”

+ The ‘Fold got some love on the newish Slate parenting podcast “Mom and Dad Are Fighting!”

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Can Science Have It All?

According to two recent articles, science as a field is male-dominated and old-fashioned in a patriarchy way, and, if that weren’t enough, suffering from funding problems. The Washington Post reports that science isn’t simply unfriendly to women but also to dudes who want to be good dads:

The majority of tenured full professors at some of the most prestigious universities in the country, who have the most power to hire and fire and set the workplace expectation of long hours, are men who have either a full-time spouse at home who handles all caregiving and home duties, or a spouse with a part-time or secondary career who takes primary responsibility for the home. And it’s not just women who are being squeezed out of academic science, the study concludes. It’s also men who want to be more active at home. … “Academic science doesn’t just have a gender problem, but a family problem,” said Sarah Damaske, a sociology professor at Penn State and one of the report’s authors. “We came to see that men or women, if they want to have families, are likely to face significant challenges.” …

Damaske said age didn’t play a role in their findings. Some men in egalitarian partnerships were well into their 60s. And some graduate students in their 20s had traditional marriages or planned not to have children in order to dedicate their lives to their careers.

At the same time, lots of talented lab types are also leaving the field because of frustrations about how research is funded

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“Radical Coop-Living Bride” Inspires Sitcom!

Because art imitates life sometimes, NBC bought a pilot inspired by the adventures of our very own Radical, Co-Op Living Bride, who we interviewed here on the ‘Fold this past spring. Her groom wrote a more detailed first-person account of their unusual, blended-family, blended-real estate lifestyle in the Atlantic this summer, which was optioned for TV (!) and will now become network reality (!!):

Written by Julia Brownell(Parenthood), the project is inspired by the growing real-world phenomenon as detailed in the recent TheAtlantic.com article “Two Couples, One Mortgage” (read it here). It is a first-person narrative about two 30-something couples — one with a baby on the way — who decide to buy and live in a Brooklyn brownstone together, creating their own version of the modern urban family. Brownell and True Jack’s Katims and Michelle Lee executive produce for Universal TV where True Jack is based.

The couples in question live in Washington, DC, but never mind; presumably the show, like all shows these days, is required to take place in Brooklyn. Though the ‘Fold will see none of the profits, we intend to take some of the credit for first recognizing the newsworthiness of this arrangement. We are on the vanguard, my friends. And so excited to see how this story unfolds.

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Analyzing America’s Most Affluent Towns

According to this map on Slate, originally from Business Insider, of the most affluent town in each state, several of the most affluent towns in America are “hidden” (Hidden Spring, Idaho; Hidden Hills, California) or otherwise make their exclusivity clear in their names (Paradise Valley, Arizona; Bayou Country Club, Louisiana). Yes, that is, apparently, a real place. So is Rafter J Ranch, Wyoming. How many people live there, do you think? Just one dude, some cattle, and his dog? The site says population has to be 1000+ but maybe they’ve fudged the numbers by counting horses.

Many of these esteemed locales are elevated, closer to God and further from the rabble, who can’t afford protection from floods: Hidden Hills, CA; Cherry Hills Village, Colorado; Nichols Hills, Oklahoma; Dakota Dunes, South Dakota; River Hills, Wisconsin; Clyde Hill, Washington; Short Hills, New Jersey; and Mission Hills, Kansas.

Valleys are pleasant, too, (Paradise Valley, AZ; East Valley, Nevada; Clarkson Valley, Missouri) if way outnumbered by summits. There’s even Emigration Canyon, Utah. But for the most part, rich people want to stay high and dry. Though near the water, when possible. Wealthy folks like coast-y parts of coastal states. That makes sense. If I had all the money, I’d want unimpeded expanses to survey from my dominion, too.

Naturally, a map like this also makes clear that the richest town in Arkansas — Maumelle, AR, median income $82,000 — wouldn’t even register in a state like Illinois, where the wealthiest concentration is Kenilworth, IL, median income $229,800. That’s, perhaps, to be expected. But what I find surprising is that among the most modest contenders here, besides Arkansas, are Nebraska (Gretna: $77,800), Vermont (Jericho: $78,000), North Dakota (Horace: $88,700), West Virginia (Shepherdstown: $81,000)  and Rhode Island (Ashaway: $84,500).

Do high-income people in those states do a better job of blending in among the general population rather than clustering? Or are there fewer high-income folks there altogether? These kinds of maps raise so many QUESTIONS.

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Can TV Women Have It All?

An in-depth Flavorwire investigation into the fall TV schedule shows that we are indeed obsessed with the question of whether American women can “have it all” — lacking, as we do here, any kind of real social safety net or infrastructure for working moms. Basically it’s like a reality show everyday for many of us: Can we achieve reasonable success in our personal *and* professional lives without paid maternity leave, subsidized quality child care, or guaranteed health insurance?? And can we remain attractive while we’re at it? TUNE IN TONIGHT, AFTER “JERSEY SHORE.”

Not surprisingly, the results are mixed:

This year, we are blessed with so many different women: a detective who struggles to balance her work and personal life, a Secretary of State who struggles to balance her work and personal life, a CIA analyst who struggles to balance her work and personal life, and so on. Once again, TV wants to know: Can women have it all? …

The best plot description is of the fictionalized sitcom version of The Life of Hillary Clinton, which is an actual real thing that’s happening whether we like it or not, starring Tea Leoni: 

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