Culture

Career Dilemmas Present in ‘The Sims 4′

Different types of Sims players have different types of goals: The Architect wants to build beautiful homes. The Murderer likes to create Sims only to watch them die slow, painful deaths by trapping them inside their homes and watching them starve. Then there is the type that I fall under: the Careerist whose goal is to get to the top of whatever career their Sim is in.

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Moving for a Relationship and Lessons From My Immigrant Parents

In August 2011 I’d just finished a year of wobbly misery in beautiful South Korea—teaching English—and by the end of it I had several thousand dollars and nothing else. I’d gone to Korea to travel and instead found myself in a swirling pool of depression, unable to connect with most of the excited ex-pats I spoke to, and unwilling to do the work to bridge the gap between myself and Koreans. This slow melt of melancholy meant that I rarely went out of my way to spend money on things, which allowed me to save more money than I knew what to do with. By the end I needed a break, so I took those thousands and went away to bum around in Southeast Asia.

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One Is the Loneliest Number, So Find a Cell Phone Family Plan

About a week after I graduated from college, I broke the news to my father: I was leaving the family plan. He had been paying my cell phone bill for the previous five years, after giving me my first phone at 17. Before cell phones were standard for teenagers, my father would make me empty my pockets before I went out with friends to show him I had a few quarters for a pay phone—just in case. But as soon as my first boyfriend started hanging around our house, he handed down his old phone without me even asking. Daddy’s little girl was expected to check in on the regular.

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Failing At Shoplifting, Life With Kesha

The “Oops, sorry, I totally thought I had paid for that” excuse stops working when you’re ten. Unless you’re a celeb, I guess.

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Parents Send Invoice After 5-Year-Old Misses Their Child’s Birthday Party

If you’re a NYC parent with a small apartment, you can take a bunch of first-graders to the spa. Or if you’re a parent in Cornwall, you can invite five-year-olds to a ski and snowboard center—and then invoice a child’s parents when their child fails to attend.

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How “Women’s Television” Does Money

How does one write a story about women and wealth on TV and not mention “Roseanne”? Or HBO’s recent reboot of “Mildred Pierce,” for that matter?

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If You’re Wearing Dockers Today, This Is Why

Business Casual Friday is the direct result of a marketing campaign to sell Dockers.

MIND. BLOWN.

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The Working Life of Gwyned Filling, the ‘Career Girl’ of 1948

On a recent sleepless night around 3 a.m., I bought a bunch of mint-condition LIFE magazines from the spring on 1948 on Ebay. Reading about stuff that was going on in 1948 is good for my 2014-era anxieties, which are currently off the charts. When I consume a news magazine from 1948, I already know what’s going to happen in 1949 and 1950, and beyond; being a detached, omniscient observer feels weirdly reassuring. Also reassuring is the evidence that the world has always been a huge mess, and that maybe some things are improving (very, very slowly). Reading these old LIFE magazines feels so poignant because the writers and subjects within have no idea what lies ahead—they’re all struggling to make some sense of their time and place.

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Is Everything Awesome? On Money and Optimism

When financial safety is at stake, it probably pays to be slightly more pessimistic than otherwise, because then you’ll be more careful, right? More ant than grasshopper. More Bert than Ernie.

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The Cost of Things: Revenge

Now, for $9.99, you can have glitter sent directly to your enemies.

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