Celebrities

Link Roundup!: Sleep You Need vs Sleep You Get; Podcast Love

+ Another way we are unequal in this paltry excuse for a civilization? The number of hours of sleep we get a night, on average, varies based on how much money we have. The effects are real, lasting, and frightening:

McCalman’s life reveals a particularly sorry side of America’s sleep-deprived culture. Though we often praise white-collar “superwomen” who “never sleep” and juggle legendary careers with busy families, it’s actually people who have the least money who get the least sleep.

Though Americans across the economic spectrum are sleeping less these days, people in the lowest income quintile, and people who never finished high school, are far more likely to get less than seven hours of shut-eye per night. About half of people in households making less than $30,000 sleep six or fewer hours per night, while only a third of those making $75,000 or more do. …

A later study on 147 adult humans found that the sleep deprived among them had actively shrinking brains. This suggests that no amount of “catch up” sleep can ever reverse the effects of sleep loss on the body.

“How do you sleep at night?” “On top of a pile of money with many beautiful ladies.”

+ The ‘Fold got some love on the newish Slate parenting podcast “Mom and Dad Are Fighting!”

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“Radical Coop-Living Bride” Inspires Sitcom!

Because art imitates life sometimes, NBC bought a pilot inspired by the adventures of our very own Radical, Co-Op Living Bride, who we interviewed here on the ‘Fold this past spring. Her groom wrote a more detailed first-person account of their unusual, blended-family, blended-real estate lifestyle in the Atlantic this summer, which was optioned for TV (!) and will now become network reality (!!):

Written by Julia Brownell(Parenthood), the project is inspired by the growing real-world phenomenon as detailed in the recent TheAtlantic.com article “Two Couples, One Mortgage” (read it here). It is a first-person narrative about two 30-something couples — one with a baby on the way — who decide to buy and live in a Brooklyn brownstone together, creating their own version of the modern urban family. Brownell and True Jack’s Katims and Michelle Lee executive produce for Universal TV where True Jack is based.

The couples in question live in Washington, DC, but never mind; presumably the show, like all shows these days, is required to take place in Brooklyn. Though the ‘Fold will see none of the profits, we intend to take some of the credit for first recognizing the newsworthiness of this arrangement. We are on the vanguard, my friends. And so excited to see how this story unfolds.

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How Joan Rivers Did Money

of course a woman who had spent her life attending the church of self-hatred would lash out at people like Lena Dunham, who has a Master’s degree in Not Giving a Shit.

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Parent Penalty FOR MOMS ONLY Blah Blah Blah Let’s Talk About Something More Cheerful

Mommies, especially low-income ones, take a hit in the labor market, whereas daddies, especially already privileged ones, reap rewards. You must be as tired of reading this nonsense as I am of writing about it.

Ms. Correll asked participants how much they would pay job applicants if they were employers. Mothers were offered on average $11,000 less than childless women and $13,000 less than fathers. In her research, Ms. Correll found that employers rate fathers as the most desirable employees, followed by childless women, childless men and finally mothers.

Low-income women lost 6 percent in wages per child, two percentage points more than the average. For men, the largest bonuses went to white and Latino men who were highly educated and in professional jobs. The smallest pay bumps went to unmarried African-American men who had less education and had manual labor jobs. “The daddy bonus increases the earnings of men already privileged in the labor market,” Ms. Budig wrote.

GAH SEXISM UNEQUAL OPPORTUNITY OUR CLASSLESS SOCIETY okay I’m out. Only good news now:

Jesse Mecham of YNAB did an AMA.

New Orleans’s economy has seriously bounced back post-Katrina; it reversed a pre-hurricane decline and is now outperforming the country in general.

Here’s what Rupert Giles maybe studied at Watcher / Librarian school.

+ New pizza box will save the world.

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Oyster Pirate, Cruise Director: Match the Writer to the Wacky Day Job!

Some of these Famous Writers’ Wacky Day Jobs I knew, and others somehow I did not. Anyway, if you haven’t clicked on the link yet, let’s do a quiz! Match the famous writer with his or her source of income:

A) Kafka

B) Salinger

C) Vonnegut

D) Bram Stoker

E) Steinbeck

F) Orwell

G) Melville

H) Nabokov

I) Jack London

J) Jack Kerouac

K) Harper Lee

L) Robert Frost

M) James Joyce

N) John Galsworthy

O) Conan Doyle

P) Dickens

Q) Dostoyevsky

R) Agatha Christie

S) William S. Burroughs

T) Joseph Heller

1. Car Dealer

2. Theater Critic

3. Tour Guide

4. Cruise Director

5. Imperial Police Officer

6. Curator

7. Bank Clerk

8. Law Clerk

9. Ticket Agent

10. Dishwasher

11. Oyster Pirate

12. Cinema Operator

13. Blacksmith’s Apprentice

14. Barrister

15. Teacher

16. Surgeon

17. Engineer

18. Factory Worker

19. Exterminator

20. Apothecary’s Assistant

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The Emmys: A Billfold Perspective

The Emmys were last night! So many dangling pendant earrings. So much bronzer. (Orange really is the new black, ba-dum-CHING.) So many long sleek hairless legs, representing so many costly hours at the gym and the spa, and so many skyscraper-like shoes hoisting those legs even further from the ground on which ordinary people spend their ordinary days. There are no losers at the Emmys: even people who don’t win get a $50,000 consolation prize.

Nearly all of the shows that do win these days are “premium” content, TV one has to pay to watch or else stream/download on the sly. As the NYT’s Alessandra Stanley puts it,

There is an exhilarating confluence of talent and opportunity at places like HBO and Showtime. Shows like “Breaking Bad” and “True Detective” are more inspired than movies, telling stories that are a complete vision rather than a committee-dulled compromise. But it’s increasingly obvious that the most rewarded series are also the ones that penalize audiences with costs that add up and count many viewers out. And that makes the Emmys, a ceremony that is always carried by a broadcast network, a paradox: a water-cooler event that increasingly exalts the boutique, paid-for television experience.

I don’t pay for either HBO or Showtime, though if I had unlimited money, I would buy unlimited cable. It’s high on the list, right up there with “beach/mountain house” and “Fluevogs.” Instead I settle for Netflix, which, for about $10/month, brings me a lot of the important shows, like “OITNB” and “Sherlock,” and which was basically shut out last night for being a brassy upstart. It’s funny to watch an event celebrating TV and realize how little of it an average person has access to.

Related: What’s an Emmy worth? CNN’s Brian Stelter explains and the NY Daily News weighs in.

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Link Roundup: Affluenza/Douchiness; Hospitals & Obamacare; Macy’s Settles with “Shoplifters”

+ Remember that Texas boy who killed a bunch of people and got off with a slap on the wrist because, his lawyers argued, his wealthy parents never taught him right from wrong? SHOCKER, his dad just got arrested. Not for never teaching his son “thou shalt not kill,” but for being a douche.

The father of the Texas teenager who killed four people while driving drunk and claimed his family’s wealth was partially to blame has been arrested for impersonating a police officer, legal documents showed. Frederick Anthony Couch was arrested on Tuesday for an incident that occurred on July 28 in the Fort Worth suburb of North Richland Hills. Couch is the father the then 16-year-old boy who was sentenced to probation for the deadly accident after his lawyers argued the enormous wealth of the youth’s family blinded him to responsibilities resulting from his actions.

+ Hospitals, Obamacare, and who qualifies for free emergency treatment.

While many charity care programs have been in place for decades, others were established following widespread complaints and lawsuits brought in the late 1990s over aggressive hospital collections tactics. Those included placing liens on patients’ homes and charging the uninsured the highest list prices, which were far more than what insurance companies paid on behalf of policyholders. Now, under the health law, nonprofit hospitals must make reasonable efforts to determine if patients qualify for help before taking tough collection tactics. And the law says the amount sought from the patient cannot be the hospitals’ list price, but an amount closer to what is generally billed to insured patients.

+ Macy’s pays $650,000 to settle with shoppers after acting like a shitty police state. Because America really needed another one of those. 

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Matt & Ben Waste Money Just Like Us

The death of Robin Williams has bubbled up lots of old stories and slideshows and videos of him communing with non-human primates, but this oral history of the making of Good Will Hunting printed in Boston Magazine in 2013, is SO GREAT (for reasons unrelated to Robin Williams).

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Kapitalism the Game, By and Starring Kim Kardashian

Perhaps you are one of those people who, when they hear “Kardashian,” thinks of the characters from “Star Trek.” You wouldn’t be too far off. Those otherworldly beings are described as “Tall, long-necked, humanoid in appearance, marked by several bony protrusions and ridges …” Though Kim’s protrusions aren’t exactly bony, that’s a good intro. NB: I am not the first person to make this joke.

The tall, long-necked humanoid TV star has gotten as rich as Kroesus, and almost as rich as Gene Roddenberry himself, by marketing her image in several media. Her latest successful money-making venture is a game that allows you, or your cute, busty avatar, to Keep Up with Kim in Hollywood. The Atlantic’s write up / review of the experience is amazing enough; I can only imagine how it feels to play:

Kim Kardashian: Hollywood [is] an app that is also a game that is also, now, a phenomenon. (“It might be our biggest game of the year,” Niccolo de Masi, CEO of the app-maker Glu Mobile Inc., told Bloomberg.) The game is free to download and play; but it allows—and encourages—in-app purchases. You use real-world money to win at Kim World. Which has meant, among other things, that Kim Kardashian is becoming even more explicitly what a reality star always will be, underneath it all: an entrepreneur.

While she has long ranked among the highest-paid of the reality (“reality”) stars—her estimated net worth, as of this June, was $45 million—the game is on track to earn $200 million, with Kim’s 45-percent cut coming in at $90 million. … Kim Kardashian: Hollywood is the game that Ayn Rand might have written, had Ayn Rand lived in the age of the smartphone and been a fan of bodycon skirts. It is what happens when objectification gives way to objectivism. “This game is so freakin stupid,” iTunes customer Dmon555 complained, before giving it a 5-star rating.

Have you played this game? Please tell me you’ve played it and that it’s as much ridiculous fun as it sounds. Have you spent any money on it? Was the experience worth it? Also, ha! The COMMENTS.

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Trust Fund Babies: They’re Just Like Us?

The last wishes of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman have leaked to the public and there are some interesting details in his will about what he wanted done with his money:

Philip Seymour Hoffman rejected his accountant’s suggestion he set aside money for his three children because he didn’t want them to be ‘trust fund’ kids, according to new court documents. In a July 18 filing in Manhattan Surrogate Court, the actor’s accountant David Friedman recalled conversations with Hoffman where the topic of a trust for his children was raised. He said Hoffman wanted his estimated $35 million fortune to go his longtime partner and the children’s mother, Mimi O’Donnell.

It’s a kind of unusual choice. My dad always inveighed against “trust fund kids” when we were growing up; his hostility toward them in the abstract was a main reason he sent my brothers and me to religious school instead of one of the DC-area’s numerous posh private schools. Did a six-year-old in a Harvard sweatshirt kick sand in his face one time, or did some bouncy-haired, Varsity-jacketed schmuck driving his father’s convertible steal my dad’s high school girlfriend?

I had no idea, and I never asked why he was so sure ready money ruined children. I just knew if I wanted to get a rise out of him I could joke about making friends with someone who had a yacht. 

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