Booze

Savvy Drinking: Is the Smart Buy the Best Value?

This Business Insider video (via Slate) points out that since cheap liquor is marked up more than pricier liquor at bars, it makes more sense to buy the expensive stuff. You’re spending more money but you’re getting a better value for your dollar.

It is true that knowing how much a draft is marked up (456%!?!) could really affect your ability to enjoy that glass of swill. (Sorry, beer.) But will you appreciate an expensive bottle of wine more because you feel like a savvy spender as well as a fancy-pants connoisseur? It probably depends on whether you enjoy expensive wine more than the regular stuff to begin with, and can afford it.

Beer is not only cheaper than a glass of wine, usually, it’s also less of a rip-off. Now if only it tasted better.

Bottom-shelf mixed drinks are as much of a rip off as draft beers. Good to know.

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“How American Do Money” According to Russians Just FYI

Apparently we here in our shining city on a hill (the US), unlike Russians, don’t like gifts, or business associates showing up at our houses unannounced. At least we don’t according to a fascinating Mental Floss experiment in DIY translation:

It’s not easy to find out what the non-English speaking world thinks of us, as it is another unique peculiarity of Americans that most only speak one language. But Google speaks many, even Russian. So with Google’s help, I set out to learn more about американский этикет, or, Russia’s take on American etiquette. (Note: We welcome any translation help from Russian-speaking Flossers.) …

“Business gifts in the U.S. are not acceptable. Moreover, they often cause suspicion. Americans fear that they could be construed as a bribe, and in the United States that is strictly punishable by law.” (Национальные особенности этикета в США)

“Showing up at a business associate’s home uninvited in the United States is not acceptable. You may be invited to a picnic if you’ve known each other for several years and are social outside the office. As a rule, the invitation will be only on a weekend, and you don’t have to prepare for something extravagant. Everything is the same as ours, only with far less booze. Bring something sporty – ball, badminton, Americans are certainly fervent fans of these things.” (Деловой этикет по-американски)

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My Last $100: Turning 24 Like a Boss

I turned 24 last Tuesday, which (I think) means that I am no longer in my early twenties so I should probably stop shopping at Forever 21 and eating beef jerky for breakfast.

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Amtrak Hacks

You need to stake a claim to two seats toward the exact middle of the train car. The “middle” part is crucial.

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“So, What’ll You Have?”

Bars! So alluring. So inviting. So terrifying to the uninitiated, the cash-poor, the afraid-of-doing-something-wrong. When I studied abroad in Denmark, everything about the drinking culture was more relaxed. Kids are allowed to buy alcohol starting at age 15 and virtually the only drunks you see stumbling about or yelling on trains are rowdy visitors over the line from Sweden, about whom Danes roll their eyes.

Once my friends and I stopped at a supermarket for beer on our way to one of Copenhagen’s zillions of parks, where we planned to drink and watch farmers bring sheep in for nighttime grazing. The guy at the check out patiently scanned each bottle and placed it, clinking against its fellows, in our backpack, until the backpack bulged like Santa’s shoulder bag. Finally he looked up at me and said, “ID please?” I gaped at him with the suavity of Urkel. He grinned and said, “Just kidding, welcome to Denmark!”

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The Cost of Things: Beer for Life, $1000

Help crowdsource funding for a bar and in return, get free beer for life. Crazy? CRAZY LIKE A FOX. The strategy worked brilliantly for Northbound Brewpub in Minneapolis:

Amy Johnson and her two business partners needed to raise $220,000 to secure a bank loan and fulfill their dream of opening a restaurant that served beer brewed right there at the pub. They went to investors who offered to give heavily for a voting share in the restaurant. But since the potential investors had no experience in the restaurant industry, the owners backed away.

And then came the idea from some friends and family who wanted to help out. “They were, like, ‘I’ve got a few grand, but I don’t have too much money,’ ” Johnson recalls. “And people kept saying this over and over, and we latched onto the idea. Why not just take a couple grand from everybody and then we’d have all the money we’d need?”

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Old People Can Be So Cute

60 Minutes does not mention that it also helps to be rich. According to US News:

Wealth and, more broadly, socioeconomic status, play a powerful role in determining how long we live.

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Make-Your-Own-Cocktail Bars at Weddings Now a Thing

When it comes to weddings, it can seem like there is nothing new under the sun. Mashed potato bar where you fill up martini glasses with cheddar, chives, and bacon bits? Ethiopian food buffet complemented by buckets of injera on each table, thoroughly confusing the elderly Jewish guests? Karaoke? A Simpsons theme? Done and done (and I mean done). If you can’t provide your guests with an original experience, though, at least you can let them have fun — like by mixing their own drinks!

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Ever Wish You Could Buy An Accelerated Wine-Making Device For The Home?

Happy Friday, everyone! Here is a video of some guys in matching zip-up sweaters telling us they’ve found a way to turn water into wine. Okay, that ‘way’ involves ‘adding the ingredients necessary to make wine’ but still: JESUS STUFF.

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Unlimited Drinks at Brunch Are Illegal, Endangered

According to Eater, The New York City Hospitality Alliance has issued a press release reminding everyone that bottomless drinks at brunch are illegal. Thanks, guys

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The Whelps of Wall Street: What It’s Like to Work as a Junior Banker in the Post-Crisis Era

Initially, Roose thought about going undercover as a banker, but as an English major who dropped an economics class after three weeks and a name that was easily Google-able, he switched gears and decided to shadow young bankers for three years as they left college and started their careers on Wall Street. His book, Young Money, is about what it’s like to work as a junior banker in the largest financial institutions in the world, and how Wall Street’s culture and recruiting efforts have shifted in the post-crisis era. I spoke to Roose while he was in town this week promoting his book.

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