books

How Wizards Do Money: Anthony Goldstein

When the owl arrived, bearing an envelope on Daily Prophet stationery, Anthony Goldstein already knew what was inside. He got the same letter every year, every time one of the Prophet reporters remembered to check a Muggle calendar and figure out when Hanukkah was. This year, they didn’t even send the note until the third night, which was why the owl stayed at Anthony’s windowsill, quietly preening and watching him as it waited for his response.

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In Defense of Scrooge

aside from being a miserable grouch, Scrooge is rather relatable

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How Wizards Do Money: Minerva McGonagall

Minerva keeps neat ledgers; a tap of her wand against the page and the numbers fly from one column to another, ordering themselves like birds on wires.

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Linda Tirado & Why It Costs Money To Save Money

If the name Tirado rings a bell, it’s perhaps because you remember the shitstorm that followed Tirado’s first blog post for Gawker about being poor in America.

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Want to Watch ‘North and South’ Together?

The Billfold Book Club has spent the past two months reading Elizabeth Gaskell’s ‘North and South.’ Do we want to watch and discuss the 2004 BBC miniseries?

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How Wizards Do Money: Susan Bones

After everything settled, though settling wasn’t exactly the right word, most of Dumbledore’s Army went home to their families. Susan went back to an empty house.

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How Wizards Do Money: Blaise Zabini

When Blaise was a young Hogwarts student, many classmates automatically assumed Blaise was female. Blaise at that time identified as male, although they identified as male primarily because nobody had presented any other option.

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The Billfold Book Club: Elizabeth Gaskell’s ‘North and South’ (Chapters 26-52)

Reader, she married him. But we all knew that was coming. Let’s talk about the economics.

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“I Don’t Believe in Owing”: How James McBride Does Money

I knew I was rich when I said I wanted a pair of jeans and I went to the store and I said, give me two of them.

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$16 Then And Now

According to an inflation calculator, my $16 twenty years ago has the buying power of $25.70 today, a difference that my eight-year-old self would have viewed with the same reverence, and my current self would have probably turned into laundry quarters.

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