Born in the USA — on a Commune in Tennessee

Communal Living at its FinestErika Anderson writes about being born on The Farm, the commune in Tennessee made famous by midwife Ina May Gaskin – and led, in “counter-cultural” but still patriarchal fashion, by Ina May’s husband. (#BanMen) What is a personal reflection about the pros and cons intentional living in the rural south doing in Vanity Fair? Who cares? If you’ve ever been curious about small-scale socialism, this is an essay for you:

Life on the inside had its charms and quirks. A Farm store operated like community-supported agriculture; I remember each house getting a box of cooking oil, Ajax, a bar of soap, margarine, salt, and seasonal vegetables, except most couldn’t supplement these with trips to a grocery store. Noodles and peanut butter were forbidden treasures for us, things my dad might buy with his weekly allowance to feed his masonry crew, since anyone who worked off The Farm had additional, necessary privileges.

While we were growing up, there was no refrigeration, but there were telephones and a laundromat. To get in line, you placed a call first thing in the morning so you could wash clothes for your entire house, which might hold a single family or 50 people. “It was a lot like calling in to win a prize at a radio station,” my mom told me, laughing. ““You are caller number four!’” Within minutes, all 15 spots would be full.

While men worked in the fields, or off The Farm to earn money, women had weekly or biweekly “house days.” One or two women would look after the kids in their home, make meals and do the laundry if they could. Then they would spend the other days of the week working in the community, outside the home. “I got to have a varied life,” my mom has said. “That was one of the things you missed when you moved away. But it was the only thing you missed.” That and friends, who had all but become family.

There’s also Lauren Groff’s novel Arcadia, about communal New York State living in the ’60s, if you want more.

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4 Comments / Post A Comment

Aunt Scar (#5,377)

Arcadia was terrible IMO. Not enough commune, too much musing on a boring fellow’s life.

cryptolect (#1,135)

@Aunt Scar I found it unreadable. After 30 pages, I thought, “life’s too short.” I’m sure it’s great for some, just so not my style. And I am interested in communes!

Derbel McDillet (#1,241)

Drop City all the way!

Tripleoxer (#5,676)

This stuff fascinates me to no end. My ex boyfriend grew up in an urban religious commune in Minnesota. It was fascinating and messed up and corrupt. Part of the reason we broke up was because despite being in his mid-20s at the time, he had no concept of how to hold a job, write a check, open a bank account, or cook a meal because he had been so sheltered by the commune growing up. It seemed to me they purposely didn’t let you learn that stuff so you’d have a harder time leaving. Either that or he was just a stupid jerk.

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