“Vegan, Gluten-Free Chocolate Brownie: $4.50″

Charrow produce illoForget you, Fresh Direct; peace out, Peapod. A bright-eyed and bushy-tailed new competitor, Good Eggs, wants your money in exchange for delivering groceries to your door. The company seems built to appeal to Brooklyn, which is one of only four places it currently operates: there’s free delivery to the borough, for starters, and its mission “is to grow and sustain local food systems worldwide.” However commendable the goal, and even, it seems, the methods, there’s something unavoidably “Stuff White People Like” about the endeavor. The vegan, gluten-free chocolate brownie ($4.50!) is described this-a-way:

Super dense and intensely chocolately, you won’t miss the gluten in this brownie. Perfect with a cup of ice cold almond milk! Our sweets contain exclusively organic, nutrient-dense, virgin, and certified raw ingredients. We use low-temperature cooking methods to retain healthy enzymes and nutrients. No processed flours, sugars, gluten, animal or dairy products, or genetically modified additives go into any of our sweets.

So, uh, almost $5 for a brownie that has nothing in it but dark chocolate? A Hershey bar will run you a lot less than that.

Is a locavore-oriented and more ethical grocery delivery system the answer to your no-time-to-food-shop prayers? Or are you already satisfied with your CSA, FreshDirect habit, or other hacks to stock your pantry, like using Postmates or TaskRabbit to get someone to bring you the condiments you’re addicted to from Trader Joe’s?

Cartoon by Charrowan artist in Brooklyn.

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7 Comments / Post A Comment

potatopotato (#5,255)

I used to work for a little company just like this! We were based in PA, and sourced as much of our food as possible from local, organic farms. The rest came from Four Seasons, which is where your local grocery store gets their organic cucumbers and stuff. Most of it was fresh food grown in the ground, but we also worked with companies that specialized in hydroponic greens, tofu products, raw milk and cheeses, and prepared foods. (One of our prepared food sources made vegan raw brownies. They were tiny, about $5, and I was not a fan.)

They definitely used the “Let us save you time so you can do what you love” angle in their advertising. Their prices on most fruits, veggies and groceries were pretty comparable to grocery store prices, and they offered free delivery on orders $25 or more. I think the locally sourced angle was more important to people, as well as the community around it. The boss would also send out a new message ever week, announcing how excited she was that they just got super beautiful chard from this farm, or that whatever dairy was a little short on raw milk this week because the baby cows needed it more right now. We were also super careful about the quality of the food we sent out. If I had the money, I would probably patronize them now.

It is absolutely the kind of thing that White People Like (TM). The irony of it was that the vast majority of our customers lived in McMansion neighborhoods that were built…on lost farmland.

NoName (#3,509)

Can “Shut up, Brooklyn” be a regular feature from now on?

(I kid – I love you Brooklynites most of the time)

NoName (#3,509)

I get so excited about these grocery delivery services and then I remember I have a Pak N’ Save foods a block away and a TJ’s a mile away with an actual free city shuttle that takes you right past the front door and I realize I will never in good conscience be able to partake of their delightfulness.

automaticdoor (#145)

Like “Or are you already satisfied with your CSA, FreshDirect habit, or other hacks to stock your pantry, like using Postmates or TaskRabbit to get someone to bring you the condiments you’re addicted to from Trader Joe’s?” isn’t super Stuff White People Like.

Love you, Ester, but come on. I hope there’s some self-awareness there.

@automaticdoor YES FAIR

sariberry (#4,420)

You know you’ve lived in NYC for too long when: $4.50 for a brownie sounds pretty normal.

Also, yes, please, “Shut Up Brooklyn” should be a regular feature.

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