So What Mid-sized City Are We All Moving To?

Nona Willis Aronowitz’s excellent Atlantic Cities series, “Where Millenials Can Make It Now,” wraps up today, which means it’s time for us to review the candidates and choose a new place to live.

My personal choice is Jackson, Mississippi, mostly because the forecast for Jackson tomorrow is a high of 75 and a low of 63, and because Nona interviewed someone there who rents an entire warehouse for $75/month.

Maybe if we all move to Jackson we could have Friday morning meetings in a warehouse and discuss our Weekend Estimates IRL? Worth considering.

My second choice is Pittsburgh, because I have been there and approve of their rolling hills and yellow bridges, but I am willing to be convinced re: Omaha and Jersey City. Cleveland and Milwaukee: you are too cold. Houston and San Antonio: well, someone needs to present a very strong argument if you’re looking to get me to live in Texas.

Photo: shoshanah

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23 Comments / Post A Comment

bgprincipessa (#699)

My bf has significantly thought about the idea of us moving to San Antonio. I’m not against it, I guess. But I know one thing: I would need to learn Spanish, for sure, for the kind of work I’d want to do. I guess what worries me is that it feels too small and I would feel like an outsider for the first time in my life – maybe that’s a good thing?

Meaghano (#529)

@bgprincipessa I have been there before, just spent the day — mostly at the Alamo. It did seem nice! The River Walk thing was lovely.

sea ermine (#122)

@bgprincipessa My friend lives there and absolutely loves it. Maybe see if you can plan a weekend trip to visit and test it out?

bgprincipessa (#699)

@sea ermine @Meaghano I have visited, only for about 2 days (with him) and we essentially did the same – Alamo, River Walk. Which was all great! But that’s probably not where locals spend their time, I’m assuming. I thought Austin felt more lively – but I’m sure that’s more expensive, tougher job market, and I hear they have a serious segregation issue going on there.

sea ermine (#122)

Yes but if you move to Texas you can get a Labrador named Tim Riggins (actual plan of mine) and pretend your life is Friday Night Lights.

Meaghano (#529)

@sea ermine this is a very valid point

flickafly (#4,808)

Houston is the 4th largest city in the US, so not exactly “mid-sized” but it is totally awesome if you live inside the loop and know how to find all the art and amazing restaurants.

Beaks (#3,488)

@flickafly San Antonio is #7, and those numbers are in the incorporated limits, which doesn’t even include the vast quantity of sprawl surrounding them- are we now defining “mid-sized” as “smaller than New York, LA and Chicago”?

Meaghano (#529)

@Beaks Guys I’m sorry, I needed a word and unthinkingly put it in. It is not even a word for cities, it is a word for rental cars. What I meant was “city that is on the list of cities in this series of articles”

Beaks (#3,488)

@Meaghano Never fear! It is actually sort of fascinating to look up city sizes on wikipedia and compare them to my mental ranking of city sizes. I have no actual links to Houston or San Antonio and am not personally offended in any way.

Hey Ella (#5,314)

I guess Seattle is a midsized city and it kind of drives me crazy, but that being said I’ve debated moving to a couple of the cities listed here. The sig other is all about Milwaukee, but I would have to live somewhere I can spell with confidence. Also, Nashville is looking nice these days too.

Meaghano (#529)

@Hey Ella Yes! Nashville is definitely on my “places I idealize even though I have only visited once when I was like 20″ list.

katiekate (#1,051)

@Hey Ella Seattle is mid-sized but the insular hibernation/neighborhood thing makes it feel even smaller. It’s also becoming really expensive, really fast, which contributes to making it feel smaller, I think. I swore I could never live in a city smaller that SEA, but then I lived in Providence, RI for two years and looooooved it. And it is tiny tiny tiny.

katiekate (#1,051)

@katiekate Seriously, PROVIDENCE, YA’LL.

EvanDeSimone (#2,101)

Come to Jersey City! Join us!

kellyography (#250)

@EvanDeSimone Ssshhhhhh. If they think we’re cheap and midsized now, I’m really going to be priced out when everybody finds out how great it is here. That said, the article did seem to focus more on the Heights, where I’m sure it’s still a lot cheaper to live than downtown.

EvanDeSimone (#2,101)

@kellyography but I want to start a Billfold colony!

mintyesq (#2,436)

I know the series had to be limited, but I wish any/all of the Triangle cities had been included (Durham/Raleigh/Chapel Hill) and Nashville too. Those are on my list of “livable” cities I would love to try out at some point.

kellyography (#250)

@mintyesq Despite leaving St. Louis eight years ago, I still champion its incredibly cheap housing market and emergence of relatively “cool” neighborhoods. Public transportation leaves a lot to be desired, though, which is bonkers considering how cheap it is to drink there.

TheDilettantista (#1,255)

@mintyesq Chapel Hill and Durham are really fantastic–I live in Chapel Hill and work in Durham, and though my taste has evolved more toward Durham, both are really lovely places to live, work, and play. Raleigh is pretty nice too but I get there less frequently.

Liz (#504)

I actually live in Pittsburgh and I would be delighted to evangelize, if people have any questions! I moved here to be a grad student (like thousands of other people–we do have two major universities) and have lived here for almost 4 years now. I’m 28, so I’m right in the target demographic.

I do really love living here. I have a fairly small stipend from my university and I can live pretty well here (it helps that I also get benefits and a free bus pass from the university, of course.) I used to live in Tokyo, and it was a pretty drastic change, moving to Pittsburgh. I moved here without even visiting once, but I don’t regret it at all. I live on a beautiful brick street in a historic neighborhood and I can walk everywhere I need to go. I might whine and complain a lot about the price of some things (like Giant Eagle’s monopoly on groceries) but it’s still a really exciting and fun place to live.

la_di_da (#1,425)

Milwaukee for the win! The segregation is terrible, but it’s affordable and only an hour from Chicago.

blueblazes (#1,798)

If Milwaukee weather is unacceptable, then so is Omaha’s. :)

You will also never see me living in a deep red state, regardless of the weather there. Nor east of the Mississippi.

So… Albuquerque?

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