The Farmer’s Daughter


I may not be smokin’ hot and wearing daisy dukes every day but I can change my tire in a pair of stilettos, bust my ass to get the impossible done, know where my food comes from, shoot a gun, and know which direction is north. I can cook a meal with three ingredients, I know what ordering a black Angus steak actually means and exactly what went into that rib eye. I can tell you what soybean aphids are, the difference between Canadian thistle and lambsquarters …I also appreciate dirt under someone’s fingernails. It means work to me. — Megan

The TV version of Little House on the Prairie’s Laura Ingalls Wilder was earnest and cutesy, but a little bit more real than another farmer’s daughter, Daisy Duke from The Dukes of Hazzard who appeared as a one-dimensional sexualized character. Modern Farmer describes the image of the farmer’s daughter as either wholesome or tempting as the “Laura-Daisy Complex” and talked to some real farmers’ daughters about what it was like for them growing up on a farm (beyond them being a male profession’s female relative).

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2 Comments / Post A Comment

Beaks (#3,488)

My mom grew up as a farm kid and I spent most summers as a kid running around on my grandparent’s farm. She spent all of high school getting up at 6am to bottle feed calves they’d purchased from the local dairy farms to raise as beef cattle. She still has a lot of pride about growing up on a farm- she can fix anything and is super self-sufficient. Even just spending summers on the farm gave me a lot of respect and knowledge about where food comes from and how much sheer hard work goes into farming. And a love for state fairs and 4H competitions.

jillcool (#2,123)

I grew up as the farmer’s daughter in rural North Dakota. I truly think that the experiences I had as a farm kid is invaluable. I just wish I could give my kids the same experience but we are established in our professions. The area we are in is semi rural (Helena, MT) but we have no local ties to agriculture. I am trying to instill the lessons I learned growing up in my children, however.

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