If You Want Your Kids to Get Jobs, Don’t Name Them ‘Kim’ Or Have Them Be Female

Kim O’Grady applied to a lot of jobs. So many jobs. Kim O’Grady got 0 responses. Kim O’Grady was like, “What is UP with this, I am a qualified applicant, a gift to my field, anyone should want me. What is GOING ON.” Then as an experiment Kim O’Grady added “MR.” in front of “Kim O’Grady.” An invitation for an interview came the next day, and a job offer the next week.

Kim is a dude so this all worked out for him but maybe the rest of us should try it anyway and then show up in a dress and be all, a HA.

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10 Comments / Post A Comment

blair (#1,962)

Does being addressed as Mr. Blair Thornburgh against my will count as the opposite problem? Because I have that. People send me their book proposals and can’t even do enough research to figure out who I am.

readyornot (#816)

@blair Yeah, I have a writer friend who has a name is almost always used for men. Like, she’s the only woman I know with this name. She thinks she got an interview for an internship at Harper’s in college because they thought she was a black man, and then she got a lot of really confused stares in person.

cawcawphony (#2,990)

I have a masculine-sounding name and work in a traditionally woman-oriented career and I like to think my name has gotten me some interviews I wouldn’t have otherwise. There’s always some surprised “Oh!”s when we actually meet or the interviewer hears my voice.

sunflowernut (#1,638)

Ahhh now I feel obligated to give any of my potential future daughters masculine sounding names. I’d never considered this angle before, and it’s depressing.

WayDownSouth (#3,431)

If this article were to make any sense, men with masculine names would have 100 percent employment, since they would get interviews and job offers immediately after sending out their CVs.

EDaily (#4,396)

@WayDownSouth Right, because sexism doesn’t make sense. It only makes sense if 100 percent of men are employed.

selenana (#673)

@EDaily Regardless of their background and skills, and only on the basis of their masculine names.

UrbanGarlic (#4,303)

“I doubt if many of the managers I had known would have made it to the second page.”

The HR people I know always say to limit a CV to one page 99% of the time. Maybe it was the two-page CV that was the culprit.

(Not downplaying sexism, just saying the article shows there could have been something else at work.)

selenana (#673)

@UrbanGarlic Probably he also cut his CV to one page at the same time as adding the Mr.

jfruh (#161)

I actually knew a white guy named “Darius” who applied for a tech job and never got a call back. He soon got a different tech job and ended up being sent to the company he had applied to as some kind of liason because his new employer was doing business with them. He had no hard feelings but mentioned that to them that he had applied, and they told him “Oh, yeah, we got your application! Haha, we thought you were black, whoops!” He was understandably flabbergasted.

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