Talking About The Working Class

“…there is a large mass of people in this country between the abjectly poor and the comfortably upper-middle-class, and we all seem to be at a loss as to how to think about them. Are they middle class? Working class? Working poor?”

In The American Scholar William Deresiewicz wonders how we should talk about the working class, and who will be able to mobilize them. On the mobilization front: “Since one of the parties is finally doing very well with the politics of identity and the other fears for its survival, it just might someday be the GOP.”

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3 Comments / Post A Comment

I think a socially conservative, economically populist party would do really well with this group of people. Which is worrying because we know how those sorts of parties usually turn out.

NUMBERS. I want representative numbers, based on cost-of-living in specific cities, etc. Because wtf is working-class anymore? I live paycheck-to-paycheck, but have a BA and work in an office. I do not have a savings account. I cannot buy a home in the city I work in, or a car. My rent is more expensive than my parents’ mortgage. I make as much money as someone in the ‘creative class’ and identify with that demographic, but I am not in a creative field. Am I working class? WHO THE HELL IS WORKING CLASS??

shallowpate (#1,701)

@Jake Reinhardt Your income is from wages, not the capital you (don’t) own. So, yeah, you’re working class.

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