Be a Pest, Is My Advice (But Like, a Tiny Pest)

TO: LOGAN
FROM: BOBBIE
do u know how i interviewed for a job two tuesdays ago? it has been 2 weeks since i interviewed for that job. i have heard nothing. not a peep. i hate everything.

 

TO: BOBBIE
FROM: LOGAN
when did you last follow up
 

TO: LOGAN
FROM: BOBBIE
i thanked him for interview after the interview. and then last tuesday i was like helloooooo im still interested would love to get this job, etc. no responses. LIKE, WHY. i want to throw a tantrum.
 

TO: BOBBIE
FROM: LOGAN
follow up again! maybe a PHONE CALL
 

TO: LOGAN
FROM: BOBBIE
i can’t just keep CHASING AFTER him. idk why i get 1 interview per year and when i get that 1, it has to be 1 that will never email me to tell me no thanks, we hated you, no job for you.
 

TO: BOBBIE
FROM: LOGAN
i think you should pester him. what ive learned from being an editor, is that, there is a lot to do. a lot of emails. a lot of everything. and sometimes i forget about people that i don’t want to forget about and i always really appreciate when they remind me they exist. so i think a quick, “i hate to be a pest, but i so enjoyed our conversation and am really excited about the company blahbalh. would love an update on where you are in the process. thanks xooxxo.” would be GREAT and also APPROPRIATE and FINE.
 

TO: LOGAN
FROM: BOBBIE
the only email i have for him is the one i used to apply for the job, like craigslistnonsense68767@cragislist.org. he’s like, getting those, right
 

TO: BOBBIE
FROM: LOGAN
no i don’t think he is.
 

TO: LOGAN
FROM: BOBBIE
oh.
 

TO: BOBBIE
FROM: LOGAN
but i do think you can use your internet skills to find his email address. that i think you can do.

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33 Comments / Post A Comment

Embrace your inner pestilence.

Heckyes (#1,162)

I am in a similar position! I interviewed for a job like 3 weeks ago and they said they’d call me within a week, but it’s been 3 weeks and… I don’t think they picked someone else but maybe they did? I’d like to follow up but I don’t/didn’t know what to say. I should just email.

EvanDeSimone (#2,101)

This is good advice. I don’t think people are really ever that annoyed by too much email. Unless your like, lurking outside someone’s house or something I think being a little pushy is the way to go. Honestly How many hiring managers have ever been like “I like this person but they want to work here TOO BADLY so forget them. Lets go with this candidate who’s not that into us”

Caitlin with a C (#3,578)

@EvanDeSimone Exactly! I had a less eloquent response to this, but yours is better. No need to apologize or feel bad for following up!

@EvanDeSimone And really, what are the consequences of annoying them? They’re not going to, like, blacklist you. There’s no secret Manager’s Facebook (…there’s not, right?) where they keep lists of everyone ever and you’ll never get a job again because you emailed one too many times. As long as you don’t tip over into stalking/harassing territory, the worst that can happen is that they tell you what their decision was.

pawnknee (#2,911)

@SarcasticFringehead Actually there is? http://www.hrblacklist.com The existence of this site gives me nightmares.

sandwiches (#1,688)

@pawnknee Holy. Shit.

Megano! (#124)

@SarcasticFringehead Well I just don’t reply at all if I get annoyed (but my max email harassment is once a week).

sheistolerable (#2,382)

I get ranting to a friend and hate to kick someone when she’s down, but personally, I’d rather hire someone who took the initiative to find the email/phone number on her own.

hungrybee (#73)

@sheistolerable Exactly. This behavior shows lack of initiative, not a fave of most managers.

TheDilettantista (#1,255)

@hungrybee Also I know this is person e-mail but all the use of “u” instead of “you” and the lack of proper capitalization, punctuation, and grammar was a big turn off. Presumably this is not how the individual types in formal correspondence but still, doesn’t give me a ton of faith/hope.

hungrybee (#73)

@TheDilettantista And also,saying thank you right after the interview is good manners, but waiting a whole week to follow up more formally? That’s a no-no, kids. Do that the next day.

@hungrybee I have to disagree with you. If I got a formal follow-up the next day, I’d be a bit put out. I’m usually interviewing people over the course of at least a week, and I’m not ready to respond to someone after interviewing them the day before.

MissMushkila (#1,044)

I have been told you really shouldn’t follow up until a little after whenever they told you the timeframe would be for the next step (which you asked about at the end of the interview).

And also, this is a post on a website where we talk about jobs and finances. It doesn’t list any last names or give details about the job. I think this is a pretty normal level of freaking out and indecision in a job search process, especially if Bobbie is in his or her twenties.

The lack of capitalization or full spellings is clearly an editorial choice (Logan is doing the same thing, it is consistent throughout the post) and should not make anyone concerned about this individual’s ability to write professionally.

kaitlinj (#1,680)

Every time (not hyperbole) I have ever interviewed for a job that I did NOT get, the interviewer stopped responding to my emails. I think that is just how things are today. Its too much work to tell someone they did not get the job; much easier to just keep deleting the emails they send you til they get the picture.

Twice, I found out I was not hired because they re-posted the job listing on craigslist.

hungrybee (#73)

I’m a hiring manager and yes, you should follow up again. Others may have already done so, and I think this is a lesson to strike while the iron is hot.

Also, this advice might be industry-specific, but a handwritten thank you goes much farther than an email. If you have a successful face to face interview, a classy and memorable move is a short (three sentences or so) thank you note. Buy a box of Crane’s ivory cards, and a good ink pen. You have just outclassed every other interviewee.

Panamanda (#2,713)

@hungrybee Ok I’ve seen this advice a lot and never totally understood it. Do people mail you the thank-you note? And just put the company’s address with Attn: Hungrybee? Or do people already have the thank-you note prepared and hand it to a secretary on the way out? Maybe its the industry I work in but I feel a lot of people would be confused by a handwritten thank-you note. And if mailed to a large company it might not even get there before a decision is made….

Lily Rowan (#70)

@Panamanda Yeah, you put it in the actual mail with an actual stamp and everything.

ghechr (#596)

@hungrybee Yes, you write a card to the company’s address and put “Attn: Interviewer’s Name” on the envelope. I have always done this after I’ve had an interview. Is this no longer the norm?

@hungrybee Hmm. I have only ever worked in fashion and IT so this might be an industry culture thing, but I cannot imagine ever sending someone a handwritten thank-you note (despite the fact that I do this in my personal life constantly). A thank-you email/phone call is usually more than appreciated and is what I do. A handwritten note would just be way too twee.

hungrybee (#73)

@KathleenD@twitter I think industry culture is a factor, but I don’t think you can be too polite. Much the same as it’s better to be overdressed, it’s better to err on the side of too polite. An email the day of interview, and a short handwritten note in the mail the next day – I’ve seen this strategy work in finance, IT and higher education.

@hungrybee I suppose I’m reluctant to do this because I’m a (comparatively) older woman who works in a traditionally very male-dominated, technology-centric business area, and I have to be careful about coming off too “feminine” and “old-fashioned”, as horrible as that sounds. I supposed if I ever interviewed with another woman about my age I’d send a handwritten thank-you note. That being said, I’m lucky that it hasn’t been an issue in the past.

hungrybee (#73)

@KathleenD@twitter Interesting perspective. Purely anecdotally, the biggest handwritten note senders I know are male executives in tech and finance. Those dudes keep cardstock and stamps in their desks.

I think the issue here is more that the interviewee here took a week to formally say thanks, and in the meantime, other people undoubtedly beat her to it.

@hungrybee Yes, now that you mention it, I have known a lot of tech and finance executives who do that as well, but only at the C-level (which I suppose proves the point).

I agree with you that a week is too long, and the next day is even pushing it for a formal thank-you. I always send a follow up thank-you email before I’m even out of the building.

@Panamanda

Right with you. I’m in health care and although it is a heavily female-dominated field, and I’ve always interviewed with women, I can’t imagine a hand-written thank you note being taken as anything but odd behavior by any of my managers and I’ve never known anyone who did it. I might send an email of thanks to a manager with whom I wanted to stay in contact for future prospects if I didn’t get the job, and have done so for jobs I refused, but a card? It likely wouldn’t even get there till after the decision had been made.

Also, every professional job I’ve ever gotten, I was offered either at the end of the interview or in a phone call the same day, and this has been the case for most of my coworkers, as well.

So I think the takeaway is, talk to other people in your specific field about what the expectations are for interviewing in that field, rather than relying on well-meaning internet advice from other industries that may lead to false hope and/or being perceived as out-of-touch.

Trilby (#191)

Here’s what you do when you’re looking for a job: send out resumes with great cover letters; go to interviews and be the most positive version of yourself possible (even if fake) but don’t talk more than necessary. Then, put that job opportunity out of your mind and get busy looking for the next one(s). Sometimes you hear back and sometimes you don’t but, like a shark, keep moving forward.

JanieS (#1,826)

Sure, be a pest if you want, but chances are you didn’t get the job.

JanieS (#1,826)

@Bill Fostex “We made the hiring decision a week ago, but if you find the right email and/or send the right kind of thank-you, we’ll totally change our minds! Really!”

ghechr (#596)

@JanieS Or it could be that they haven’t decided yet?

sockhopbop (#764)

@ghechr Yes! My friend got hired for a great job, but it took them 3 weeks after his second interview to decide!

@JanieS I think this used to be true, but in very recent times hiring practices seem to have lost the plot completely. I would not be surprised if the hiring manager just go sidetracked and forgot to offer someone the job (this has happened).

pawnknee (#2,911)

Well timed, Logan. And good advice. I sent out a few follow up emails to HR people today thanks to the inspiration. Fingers crossed.

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