But Back to that HSBC Thing

You know that HSBC settlement? The one where the bank was knowingly laundering drug money AND YET is not facing criminal charges? It’s a week later and it’s still ridiculous, and actually it’s worse than that—it’s EGREGIOUS. I keep thinking about something Mark Greif said when I talked to him about The Trouble Is The Banks: “There is a tendency to side with people who are more organized—the banks, the people in power.” Like, it’s a BANK! It must not have done it ON PURPOSE! It must have been an OVERSIGHT?! NOPE. Two important things to read about it:

Matt Taibbi at Rolling Stone: 

“So you might ask, what’s the appropriate financial penalty for a bank in HSBC’s position? Exactly how much money should one extract from a firm that has been shamelessly profiting from business with criminals for years and years? Remember, we’re talking about a company that has admitted to a smorgasbord of serious banking crimes. If you’re the prosecutor, you’ve got this bank by the balls. So how much money should you take?

“How about all of it? How about every last dollar the bank has made since it started its illegal activity? How about you dive into every bank account of every single executive involved in this mess and take every last bonus dollar they’ve ever earned? Then take their houses, their cars, the paintings they bought at Sotheby’s auctions, the clothes in their closets, the loose change in the jars on their kitchen counters, every last freaking thing. Take it all and don’t think twice. And then throw them in jail.

“Sound harsh? It does, doesn’t it? The only problem is, that’s exactly what the government does just about every day to ordinary people involved in ordinary drug cases.”

Neil Barofsky at Naked Capitalism: 

“Why no criminal charges? Why instead only some remedial measures and a “historical” fine that can be measured in weeks — not years — of earnings? It certainly wasn’t for lack of evidence. No, instead the government determined that HSBC is not only too big to fail, but also too big to jail. As the New York Times first reported, even though there were strong voices within DOJ pushing for criminal charges, the big banks’ best friends within the government (the Treasury Department, of course, and other unnamed regulators) were too fearful that an indictment could destabilize the global financial system. Yes, it’s 2008 all over again. In the name of systemic stability, a megabank again escapes accountability for its actions, rescued by compliant officials.”

 

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5 Comments / Post A Comment

josefinastrummer (#1,850)

How can anyone trust the government if this isn’t even a secret? Do people really believe that justice is blind and if you were accused of something, you would have a fair trial? I certainly don’t. I want someone to explain to me how I am supposed to believe in a country that allows stuff like this to happen SO OPENLY.

@josefinastrummer I totally agree in principle. However, on a podcast I listened to recently the DOJ spokesperson said that basically if they pursued a criminal indictment against HSBC (the company) it would be forced to shut down its US operations and put a lot of people out of work. But as Taibbi points it would be easy under current drug law to also go after individual executives who are US citizens or residing in the US.

Any lawyers out there know if someone who was e.g. a victim of a drug cartel could bring some kind of civil case here and at least drag them through discovery? Or would they just cough up another billion dollar settlement and be on their merry way?

josefinastrummer (#1,850)

@stuffisthings But according to the law or whatever, we are funneling money that allows Mexican drug lords to do their thing, which according to the law is illegal and leads to people’s death! This is why we won’t legalize drugs! There is too much money in it.

We can send thousands of manufacturing jobs overseas but we don’t want anyone working at the bank to lose his job? Unemployment sucks but if that’s what it takes to get the banks to stop doing this, so be it.

Yeah but Benghazi Benghazi Benghazi Benghazi fiscal cliff blurgh.

e (#734)

I am closing my HSBC account. When I called to figure it out, the lady on the other end of the line said, “may I ask why you are closing your account?” And I said, “because of all the money laundering for mexican drug cartels and maybe al Qaeda.”
And she was like, “oh. yeah. That.”

She didn’t exactly say that, but pretty much.

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