My Spanish Bread Secret (And My Tokyo Tofu Secret)

When I lived briefly in Spain, my small village had a bread truck that would tootle around peddling fresh-baked finery at dirt cheap prices. You could get small round or oblong loaves for as little as 35 pesetas. When my friend and I heard the bread truck song, we would scramble for change and rush down the stairs like kids to an ice cream truck, frantic not to miss the jostle of acquiring fresh baked bread, jockeying for position amongst the neighborhood abuelas picking out their daily ration. The market sold bread too, sometimes even proclaiming HAY PAN CALIENTE, but the bread truck bread always tasted better.

Now I live in Japan, and while the bread isn’t very good and there is nary a bread nor ice cream truck to be seen, there is a tofu truck that putters through my neighborhood once or twice a week, hocking freshly made ‘fu in a variety of styles. Whenever I manage to make it into the street, coins in hand, I still thrill a little at the experience of getting my food from a specialty vendor come right to my door. He always throws in a little bonus of a few pieces of age-dofu (deep-fried tofu), and they always tastes better than the ones from the supermarket.

 

Selena Hoy loves carbs. 

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14 Comments / Post A Comment

Megano! (#124)

WHAT NO GOOD BREAD IN JAPAN WHERE ARE YOU GOING!?
Also who wants to start a bread truck with me we’ll make MILLIONS.

@Megano! OKAY~!

Megano! (#124)

@redheaded&crazy OK so we probably won’t make millions because I will eat all the bread.

selenana (#673)

@Megano! and @redheaded&crazy Please do this! There are some halfway decent French-ish style bakeries around, so it is possible to procure a passable baguette, but good whole-grain bread is nowhere to be found. I have become a white bread eater. Also, cupcakes haven’t really hit Japan. FREE BUSINESS IDEA.

@Megano! we will actually lose millions as the truck becomes a war zone, each of us fighting tooth and nail for that last piece of delicious, fresh, crusty bread

but hey, it could be fun

Megano! (#124)

@selenana Really? Because there were so many good bakeries in Japan! I WENT TO ALL OF THEM.

I like how this article about secrets literally is secret, revealing not even a general area in either Spain or Japan. SPAIN: Has good bread from a truck somewhere!

selenana (#673)

@sorry your heinous That’s the thing about trucks! They are hard to pin down.
Bread trucks seem to be a thing in Spain – at least in rural areas. They seem to do the rounds in most small towns, so you can just pick one.

Although my point was that things sold off the back of trucks taste better.

@selenana It made me laugh :)

Every time I see “Secret” in a blog headline, I think of acaia berries and penis pills. Just sayin’.

selenana (#673)

Oops, *hawk not *hock.

ImThraxx (#1,237)

Mixture in Shimokitazawa is one of the many places in Tokyo you can buy and enjoy fantastic bread. There’s also a shop on 1bangai where you can buy donuts made with tofu, they are rad.

Tokyo is actually just chock full of first-class bakeries, though, like @Megano! said. They are pretty expensive, if we’re talking about supermarket bread I can definitely see your point.

selenana (#673)

@ImThraxx Oh hey, fellow Japan-lander. Do you live in Shimokita?

Yeah, as I mentioned above, it is certainly possible to get a passable baguette, even a pretty damn good baguette in a few spots. I am partial to Viron in Shibuya and the sesame flute at Paul. And I certainly won’t argue that you can find good cakes and donuts pretty easily (Mister Donut even has a tofu donut.)

But finding a whole grain is like finding gold. And for most of Japan, it’s the supermarket wonder bread-esque stuff or maybe a vie-de-france style baguette.

I want to eat bread truck bread!!

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